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From MSDN Search the mask data from most significant bit (MSB) to least significant bit (LSB) for a set bit (1).

unsigned char _BitScanReverse ( unsigned long * Index, unsigned long Mask );

Parameters [out] Index Loaded with the bit position of the first set bit (1) found.

[in] Mask The 32-bit or 64-bit value to search.

Return Value 0 if the mask is zero; nonzero otherwise.

Remarks If a set bit is found, the bit position of the first set bit found is returned in the first parameter. If no set bit is found, 0 is returned; otherwise, 1 is returned.


Please tell me how to implement a safe and fast _BitScanReverse() function on OS X? Do I have to use assembly or is there more simple way?

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It's not clear from the above what gets returned in Index - what is meant by "bit position"? Could you give an example of how you want to use the function. –  nbt May 30 '11 at 9:50
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

GCC has some similar built-ins:

— Built-in Function: int __builtin_clz (unsigned int x)

Returns the number of leading 0-bits in x, starting at the most significant bit position. If x is 0, the result is undefined.

— Built-in Function: int __builtin_ctz (unsigned int x)

Returns the number of trailing 0-bits in x, starting at the least significant bit position. If x is 0, the result is undefined

If you have the number of zeros, you should be able to figure out where the first 1 is. :-)

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The code below is something I wrote a while back for Linux - it finds the highest set bit, which I think is what you are asking for. It doesn't follow your exact specs, but should be easily adaptable.

Further notes:

  • A return of 0 means that bit-0 was set; if no bits are found then 64 is returned.
  • This assembler is written for the calling convention used by GCC under Linux. I don't know how this differs under Mac OS X - you need to check.
  • Input is a 64-bit unsigned int.
  • Each CPU architecture is written into a separate .S source file and selectively compiled using 'gcc' depending on the target being built. I don't use inline assembler.

x86:

/*
 * Find the highest set bit in a bitboard.
 *
 * %eax: &bb
 */
.globl x86_msb;
.type x86_msb,@function;
x86_msb:
    mov 4(%eax), %edx
    bsr %edx, %eax
    jz msb_z1
    add $32, %eax
    ret
msb_z1:
    mov (%eax), %edx
    bsr %edx, %eax
    jz msb_z2
    ret
msb_z2:
    mov $64, %eax
    ret

x86_64:

/*
 * Return the offset of the highest set bit in the bitmask
 *
 * %rdi: &bb
 */
.globl x64_msb;
.type x64_msb,@function;
x64_msb:
    movq (%rdi), %rdi
    bsrq %rdi, %rax
    jz msb_empty
    ret
msb_empty:
    mov $64, %eax
    ret

Here are the Windows implementations (.asm file):

x86:

;;
;; Return the offset of the highest set bit in the bitmask
;;
;; ECX: &bb
;;
public @x86_msb@4
@x86_msb@4:
    mov edx, dword ptr [ecx + 4]    ; bb (high)
    bsr eax, edx
    jz msb_z1
    add eax, 32
    ret
msb_z1:
    mov edx, dword ptr [ecx]        ; bb (low)
    bsr eax, edx
    jz msb_z2
    ret
msb_z2:
    mov eax, 64
    ret                         ; bb is empty

x86_64:

;;
;; Return the offset of the highest set bit in the bitmask
;;
;; RCX: &bb
;;
x64_msb PROC
    mov r8, qword ptr [rcx] ; r8 = bb
    bsr rax, r8         ; rax = lsb(bb)
    jz msb_empty
    ret
msb_empty:
    mov eax, 64         ; bb was empty
    ret
x64_msb ENDP
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