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I'm working on a project for the iPhone that involves manipulating sound buffers to produce an audio file on the iPhone. I start with an array of audio samples (written in C) called sets:

int *sets = (int*) malloc(size_of_instrumental*size_output *sizeof(int)); 

where size of instrumental is 470402 and size_of_output varies. Presently everything works fins if size_of_output is 1 or 2, but anything beyond that and nothing gets written to my audio file. Is it possible that there is a limit to how much memory I can allocate? If so, are there any solutions to this? Ideally I would like size_of_output to go up to 10 (therefore 10 x 470402).

Thanks!

EDIT 1


global_size_output = 2;


printf("\n number vocal sets %d\n ", global_size_output );

int *sets = (int*) malloc(global_size_of_instrumental*global_size_output *sizeof(int)); 


int *set_1 = (int *) malloc((global_size_of_instrumental) * sizeof(int)); // I took this line from wave header reader. The number is the number of samples of the hip hop track.
int *mixed_set_1 = (int *) malloc(global_size_of_instrumental* sizeof(int)); // I took this line from wave header reader. The number is the number of samples of the hip hop track.
audio_effects_1(volume_adjusted_vocal_data, vocal_flags, number_vocal_flags, beat_flags, number_beat_flags, set_1, 0);
mix_audio(set_1, hip_hop_samples, mixed_set_1); // GET RID OF event_positions --> see comment below!

for (int i = 0; i<global_size_of_instrumental; i++) {
    sets[i]= mixed_set_1[i];
}





if (global_size_output > 1) {


printf("\n writing 2nd set \n\n\n");
int *set_2 = (int *) malloc((global_size_of_instrumental) * sizeof(int)); // I took this line from wave header reader. The number is the number of samples of the hip hop track.
int *mixed_set_2 = (int *) malloc(global_size_of_instrumental* sizeof(int)); // I took this line from wave header reader. The number is the number of samples of the hip hop track.
audio_effects_1(volume_adjusted_vocal_data, vocal_flags, number_vocal_flags, beat_flags, number_beat_flags, set_2, 6);
mix_audio(set_2, hip_hop_samples, mixed_set_2); // GET RID OF event_positions --> see comment below!

for (int i = global_size_of_instrumental; i<(global_size_of_instrumental*2); i++) {
    sets[i]= mixed_set_2[i-global_size_of_instrumental];
}

  } 

Basically I take a buffer of vocal data, do stuff with it, then mix it with a buffer of instrumental music. I repeat this process depending how big the buffer of vocal data is and then add everything to an array called sets which I then use to generate a wav file. I hope this explanation is clear enough.

EDIT 2

Here is the code I use to generate the wav file:

void createNewWAV (const char *location, int *sample_array){

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

NSString *filePath = NSTemporaryDirectory();

filePath = [filePath stringByAppendingPathComponent:@"iMC_Rap_Maker.wav"];


NSURL *fileURL = [NSURL fileURLWithPath:filePath];

AudioStreamBasicDescription asbd;


memset(&asbd,0, sizeof(asbd));

asbd.mSampleRate = SAMPLE_RATE;
asbd.mFormatID = kAudioFormatLinearPCM;


// I switched this format so that I could record a .wav instead of a .caf.
// I learned this by referencing the AQRecorder.mm file. 
asbd.mFormatFlags = kLinearPCMFormatFlagIsSignedInteger | kLinearPCMFormatFlagIsPacked;
// asbd.mFormatFlags = kAudioFormatFlagIsBigEndian;


asbd.mBitsPerChannel = 16;
asbd.mChannelsPerFrame = 1;
asbd.mFramesPerPacket = 1;
asbd.mBytesPerFrame = 2;
asbd.mBytesPerPacket = 2;



AudioFileID audioFile;

OSStatus audioErr = noErr;

audioErr = AudioFileCreateWithURL((CFURLRef)fileURL, 
                                 kAudioFileWAVEType,   
                                  &asbd,
                                  kAudioFileFlags_EraseFile,
                                  &audioFile);
assert (audioErr == noErr);



int size_of_output = global_size_output;
SInt16 *the_samples = (SInt16 *) malloc(global_size_of_instrumental*size_of_output*sizeof(SInt16)); // I took this line from wave header reader. The number is the number of samples of the hip hop track.

for (int i=0; i< global_size_of_instrumental*size_of_output; i++)  // let us do one second for now, but eventually will need array length. 
{
    the_samples[i] = sample_array[i];

}



UInt32 numSamples = global_size_of_instrumental*size_of_output;
UInt32 bytesToWrite = numSamples*size_of_output;



audioErr = AudioFileWriteBytes(audioFile, false, 0, &bytesToWrite, the_samples);

audioErr = AudioFileClose(audioFile);
assert(audioErr == noErr);

[pool drain];       

 }
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1  
Casting the return value of malloc() in C is wrong; the compiler can do the convertion all by itself. The cast, if it specifies the same conversion the compiler would have done, is redundant and, otherwise hides errors the compiler would have caught. –  pmg May 30 '11 at 9:53
    
Thanks @pmg. What would be the solution to this? –  Eric Brotto May 30 '11 at 10:16
    
Your problem is probably not in the amount of memory you allocate: if sizeof (int) is 4, a size_output of 10 tries to allocate less than 20M. Post more code. Remember to free the memory when you no longer need it, especially if you're doing several allocations... –  pmg May 30 '11 at 10:22
    
@pmg, I've posted some code. Any help would be awesome! If my explanation is not clear, do let me know :) –  Eric Brotto May 30 '11 at 10:33
    
You're leaking memory (malloc'ing and not free'ing) in the if (global_size_output > 1) loop. Do not leak memory. #include <stdlib.h> and get rid of the casts to the malloc return value. –  pmg May 30 '11 at 10:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Check this

Tuning for Performance and Responsiveness

share|improve this answer
    
I really don't understand people who accept answers without upvoting them. –  P i Jun 24 '11 at 13:46
    
Dead link. That's why you should explain things here on SO instead of linking toward a page... –  thibaultd Nov 11 at 9:56

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