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I decided to solve the problem of finding given characters in a string. And I solved it in two ways:

The first(using hash-table to keep the values in ASCII for the chars we want to find):

static void Hash(string text, char[] charsToFind)
{
    Dictionary<int,char> chars = new Dictionary<int,char>();
    foreach (var letter in charsToFind)
    {
        chars[(int)letter] = letter;
    }

    foreach (var letter in text)
    {
        if (chars.ContainsKey((int)letter))
        {
            if (letter == chars[(int)letter])
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Element found at: {0}, value: {1}", (int)letter, letter);
            }
        }
    }
}

And the second way (the naive):

static void Naive(string text, char[] charsToFind)
{
    foreach (var letter in text)
    {
        foreach (var character in charsToFind)
        {
            if ((int)letter == (int)character)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Element found at: {0}, value: {1}", (int)letter, letter);
            }
        }
    }
}

And everything works fine! The question I'd like to ask is which one is the better and if there are even better solutions to this problem?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Does limitation "only .NET 2.0" exist or you're free to use 3.5 or 4.0? –  abatishchev May 30 '11 at 10:09
    
you can use every version od .NET –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 10:10
1  
Your first method is wrong. It should be a Dict<char,int> and you should populate it with for(int i = text.Length - 1; i > -1; i--) chars[text[i]] = text[i]; –  Alxandr May 30 '11 at 10:13
    
Got it! Thanks! –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 10:16
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using LINQ:

string input = "abc";
char[] charsToFind = new[] { 'a', '1', 'b' };
IEnumerable<int> ids = charsToFind.Select(ch => input.IndexOf(ch)); // { 0, -1, 1 }

With Hashset<T> which is generic hash table:

HashSet<char> set = new HashSet<char>(input.ToCharArray());
...
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But is my algorithm with the hash table more efficient and better? –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 10:10
    
+1. .@Tsvetan, you can probably take sample inputs and check execution time. –  Sandeep G B May 30 '11 at 10:15
    
I know, but I'm asking about which one is the better in terms of programming practise. –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 10:21
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The first one is a better approach, but the second one will probably be faster for a small number of characters.

Some comments on the first one. In the first one, using a dictionary involves cost of calculating the hash and performing a lookup. If you knew the chars were ASCII, you could use an array to speed up the lookup.

Rather than doing a 'ContainsKey' you could do a 'TryGetValue' to only lookup once.

share|improve this answer
    
I know the characters were ASCII, but I read that using hash-table was a better approach. So, I decided to ask here... –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 10:23
    
Yes, but the hash table is slower as it needs to do more work. –  Nick Randell May 30 '11 at 12:36
    
The interesting thing I found is that the naive algorithm is the fastest(~0010000ms). Then its the hash and after that the LINQ. The tests were made on 30,7KB of text. I'll try your approach too and will see what will happen... –  Tsvetan May 30 '11 at 12:46
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