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When implementing dynamic dispatch using dynamic on a generic class, and the generic type parameter is a private inner class on another class, the runtime binder throws an exception.

For example:

using System;

public abstract class Dispatcher<T> {
    public T Call(object foo) { return CallDispatch((dynamic)foo); }

    protected abstract T CallDispatch(int foo);
    protected abstract T CallDispatch(string foo);
}

public class Program {
    public static void Main() {
        TypeFinder d = new TypeFinder();

        Console.WriteLine(d.Call(0));
        Console.WriteLine(d.Call(""));
    }

    private class TypeFinder : Dispatcher<CallType> {
        protected override CallType CallDispatch(int foo) {
            return CallType.Int;
        }

        protected override CallType CallDispatch(string foo) {
            return CallType.String;
        }
    }

    private enum CallType { Int, String }
}

Here, a RuntimeBinderException will be thrown with the message

'Dispatcher.CallDispatch(int)' is inaccessible due to its protection level

The reason for the inaccessibility is that the type parameter T is the private CallType which Dispatcher<T> cannot access. Therefore, CallDispatch must be inaccessible - but it isn't, because it's accessible as T.

Is this a bug with dynamic, or is this not supposed to be supported?

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Given that this is a partial class the problem might lie elsewhere (cause obviously this isn't the only file). –  Alxandr May 30 '11 at 10:26
    
Alxandr: this is the only file. The partial was there because I had used it before as a partial class and forgot to remove that. –  configurator May 30 '11 at 11:02
    
I don't think this is a bug. I'd surmise that things are made private for the exact reasons your code is exhibiting - to not be called where it oughtn't be. –  Antony Koch Jun 1 '11 at 12:34
1  
I've opened a query on Connect: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/672411/… –  configurator Jun 2 '11 at 11:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's a bug. If you can make the call statically (and you can), you should be able to make it dynamically.

Specifically, the following code works:

using System;

public abstract class Dispatcher<T> {
    public T Call(object foo)
    {
        return CallDispatch(((object)(dynamic)foo).ToString());
    }

    protected abstract T CallDispatch(int foo);
    protected abstract T CallDispatch(string foo);
}

public class Program {
    public static void Main() {
        TypeFinder d = new TypeFinder();

        Console.WriteLine(d.Call(0));
        Console.WriteLine(d.Call(""));
    }

    private class TypeFinder : Dispatcher<CallType> {
        protected override CallType CallDispatch(int foo) {
            return CallType.Int;
        }

        protected override CallType CallDispatch(string foo) {
            return CallType.String;
        }
    }

    private enum CallType { Int, String }
}

Note that I've used ToString() to make the static type known, the C# compiler and CLR allow this context to access the private type CallType, so the DLR should allow it as well.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe the question is "why can I return the private enum CallType as the generic return value from my Call method even though it's a private class member?" - nothing to do with whether you can/can't make the call, the OP freely states that he gets an error at runtime. (I agree, it should cause an error at both runtime and compile time or at neither, but that's not the question) –  Nathan May 31 '11 at 13:16
1  
@Nathan: If Dispatcher<CallType> doesn't have sufficient access to make the call, my version would fail. But my code compiles and runs without error. Hence everything needed is accessible, and the DLR is wrong to raise an error stating otherwise. –  Ben Voigt May 31 '11 at 14:22
1  
Nathan: No, my question was: "Why can't I make this call dynamically when I can make it statically? Is it a bug, or am I missing something?" –  configurator May 31 '11 at 14:29
    
configurator: fair enough, I suggest you make your question clearer - several people, myself included have come up with answers to what they thought was your question. Apologies to Ben. –  Nathan Jun 1 '11 at 8:25
1  
@Ben: Doh, you're right. That's not the first time I've been tripped up by that in this example... –  Jon Skeet Jun 2 '11 at 6:34

It's a bug because the following static typing change should be equivalent

using System;

public abstract class Dispatcher<T>
{
    public T Call(int foo) { return CallDispatch(foo); }
    public T Call(string foo) { return CallDispatch(foo); }

    protected abstract T CallDispatch(int foo);
    protected abstract T CallDispatch(string foo);
}

And it works.

This issue seems to be an issue with the compiler and the dlr calls it makes and the static information the compiler includes in the invocation. It can be worked around with the open source framework ImpromptuInterface that manually setups the dlr calls. With Impromptu by setting the context to this it's getting access permissions from the runtime type which will be TypeFinder.

using System;
using ImpromptuInterface.Dynamic;
public abstract class Dispatcher<T>
{
    protected CacheableInvocation _cachedDynamicInvoke;

    protected Dispatcher()
    {
        _cachedDynamicInvoke= new CacheableInvocation(InvocationKind.InvokeMember, "CallDispatch", argCount: 1, context: this);
    }

    public T Call(object foo)
    {
        return (T) _cachedDynamicInvoke.Invoke(this, foo);
    }

    protected abstract T CallDispatch(int foo);
    protected abstract T CallDispatch(string foo);
}
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