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I'm trying to sort a simple list of objects by a long - the below isn't working because one of the long strings is pushed to the top simply because it starts with a lower number. So I'm looking for a way to sort these by the actual long values directly

The current obj implementation looks something like the below. In the class I'm using this I call Collections.sort(trees);

public class Tree implements Comparable<Tree> {
    public String dist; //value is actually Long

    public int compareTo(Tree o) {
        return this.dist.compareTo(o.dist);
    }
}
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Why don't you just compare the long-values of dist in your compareTo(Tree o) method? –  Jacob May 30 '11 at 12:05
1  
Strings are compared alphabetically (not really but it's a good way to think of). Hence, 12 > 111. If you need to compare numbers use numbers, i.e. add one more field long. Or in the worst case compare the result of Long.parseLong(dist) –  bestsss May 30 '11 at 12:05
    
Turns out I was actually comparing a double the entire time - sorry guys (went with Double.compare as my actual solution) awarded what I felt was a great answer to the Long problem though - flag it for removal if nothing else –  Toran Billups May 30 '11 at 12:43
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

why not actually store a long in there:

public class Tree implements Comparable<Tree> {
    public long dist; //value is actually Long

    public int compareTo(Tree o) {
        return this.dist<o.dist?-1:
               this.dist>o.dist?1:0;
    }
}

that or first compare the length of the strings and then compare them

public String dist; //value is actually Long
public int compareTo(Tree o) {
    if(this.dist.length()!=o.dist.length())
          return this.dist.length()<o.dist.length()?-1:1;//assume the shorter string is a smaller value
    else return this.dist.compareTo(o.dist);
}
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Update: Since Java 7 you can do Long.compare(x, y); instead of writing such code yourself (not a revolution, but simpler). –  Christophe Roussy Apr 16 at 13:09
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It depends on how you want to do things? Do you want to keep the current implementation of Comparable? If yes, use the sort method which takes a Comparator and implement a custom comparator which uses the actual "long" values of the string (Long.parseLong(dist)). If no, then just modify the current compareTo and use the Long values of the "dist".

BTW, I'd revisit the logic and ask myself why "dist" is of type String when it is actually a Long?

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well if the dist variable is actually long then you might try using

public int compareTo(Tree o) {
    return Long.valueOf(this.dist).compareTo(Long.valueOf(o.dist));
}
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will not compile (Long.parseLong return primitive long) –  bestsss May 30 '11 at 12:20
1  
s/parseLong/valueOf/ –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 30 '11 at 12:38
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Why not

public class Tree implements Comparable<Tree> {
    public Long dist;

    public int compareTo(Tree o) {
        return this.dist.compareTo(o.dist);
    }
}
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I think we can use the following code to compare Long Value,

Collections.sort(longValueList,new LongComparator());

LongComparator.java

public class LongComparator implements Comparator {



    @Override
    public int compare(Object obj1, Object obj2) {


        return (obj1.toString()).compareTo(obj2.toString());
    }

}

Thanks Deepak

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I'm pretty sure that will sort 19999999999999 before 2. –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 30 '11 at 12:37
    
@Sean, that's not true! Guess why :) (the class does have toString, so it'd use the default object.toString) –  bestsss May 30 '11 at 12:59
    
@bestsss I think we are misunderstanding each other. I mean this: ideone.com/btySM –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 30 '11 at 14:02
    
@Sean, okay, if you compare longs it will have the same effect but heck, how the name is LongComparator (I know you can name it __$__ but still) –  bestsss May 30 '11 at 14:34
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