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Hi I have a question about SUM in sql,

I have a query that looks like this

SELECT 
 SUM ( table_one.field + table_two.field )  as total_field
 SUM ( total_field + table_one.anotherfield )
FROM 
 table_one
JOIN
 table_two ON table_one.id = table_two.id
WHERE 
 table_one = 1

But this doesn't work ( dont mind possible typing errors in JOIN statement, only the second SUM is the probly the query works perfecly without that SUM)

Is there another way to do it, as I need the total_field within my application. I can ofcource add those numbers within the application but I prefer to do it in sql.

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Besides the other comments, your WHERE clause is missing the field name of what equals 1. –  Andrew Lazarus May 30 '11 at 17:46
    
@Andrew Lazerus Yes I saw that when I summited the question, but didn't edit it because it isn't relevant to the question. –  Robbert Stevens May 31 '11 at 8:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot use the column alias in an aggregate to reference the value, just SUM again;

SELECT 
 SUM ( table_one.field + table_two.field ) as total_field, --your missing a , also
 SUM ( table_one.field + table_two.field + table_one.anotherfield )
FROM 
 table_one
JOIN
 table_two ON table_one.id = table_two.id
WHERE 
 table_one = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Oke thanks this is it, but personally I don't like the solutions because if it happens the total_field SUM gets more field to SUM up I have to manually edit the second SUM. But this will work for now –  Robbert Stevens May 30 '11 at 13:18

SUM is an aggregate function. This means you can aggregate data from a field over several tuples and sum it up into a single tuple.

What you want to do is this:

SELECT 
  table_one.field + table_two.field,
  table_one.field + table_two.field + table_one.anotherfield

or maybe this:

SELECT 
  SUM(table_one.field) + SUM(table_two.field),
  SUM(table_one.field) + SUM(table_two.field) + SUM(table_one.anotherfield)
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Try replacing "total_field" with "table_one.field + table_two.field" in second SUM().

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The name "total_field" is an alias and as such cannot be used in an aggregate functions The easiest and quickest way is to simply replace the code for total_field in the second calculation.

SELECT
   SUM ( ISNULL(table_one.field,0) + ISNULL(table_two.field,0) )  as total_field
   SUM ( ISNULL(table_one.field,0) + ISNULL(table_two.field,0) +     IsNUll(table_one.anotherfield,0) )
from
  table_one

As your code doesn't cater for a null value in the fields you may get warnings when sum the values. I would suggest using IsNull as above and if there is a null value just treat it as 0.

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In the database and application design I have there will always be a value in the fields. But thanks for the tip, I didn't know that –  Robbert Stevens May 30 '11 at 13:23
    
At least in a standard DB, what armitage wrote isn't correct, escept the explanation of total_field, which is true. NULL propagates, i.e., anything+NULL is NULL, and SUM of data with NULL is NULL. But it doesn't give a warning. This is expected behavior. Moreover, where the answer has ISNULL, the correct standard function is COALESCE. Tip: if the fields can not be null, make sure to declare them that way in the table definition. –  Andrew Lazarus May 30 '11 at 17:49
    
Andrew I guess I wasn't explaining myself very well. I was trying to point out as you correctly did that add anything to Null gives Null. I was just trying to help the original poster aware that he may get unexpected results with his sum statements. Thanks for clarifying! –  armitage May 31 '11 at 12:50

You could use a subquery like this:

SELECT
  total_field,
  total_field + sum_anotherfield
FROM (
  SELECT 
    SUM(table_one.field + table_two.field) AS total_field,
    SUM(table_one.anotherfield) AS sum_anotherfield
  FROM 
    table_one
  JOIN
    table_two ON table_one.id = table_two.id
  WHERE 
    table_one.somefield = 1
) x
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