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I'm looking for a proper way to bind to controls together. Let's say I have two separate views. Each of those views has a control and I want to bind them together. First control has a dependency property and expects that the second control will be assigned to that property.
If I correctly understand the idea of MVVM, I don't want to have those controls in my viewmodel, just the data. So I'm trying to find a proper way to pass a control from one view to the other.
Dependency property in the View's code behind to bind the control? Would that be correct way to do that? Doesn't look a very clean way though. Considering the fact that the data context of the view would be viewmodel and not the code behind, I'll be forced to bind those controls together in the code instead of declarative way.
Maybe I'm missing something simple here. Any suggestions are appreciated.


To clarify:
The situation is as follows: 2 different views and 2 different controls. Each control resides on separate view. ControlA has a dependency property of type ControlB. So I need to do something similar to element binding but the problem is that I don't have both elements in the same view.

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Would you tell me what is your goal/task? not the technical details. So I can help you better :) –  msfanboy May 31 '11 at 8:23

3 Answers 3

I'm not really sure what you mean by "bind together", but perhaps you're looking for something like this?

<local:UserControlB x:Name="UserControlB" />
<local:UserControlA local:UserControlA.SubControlB="{Binding ElementName=UserControlB}" />

Why are you passing controls between views anyways? Usually you pass around Data or the DataContext

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Thank you for the suggestion, but it would only work if the controls are in the same view. I really don't want to pass the controls around as you say, but I don't see another way to do that. I use third party controls and by design controlA depends on controlB. In my case they are put in separate views. –  incognito May 31 '11 at 7:30
    
@incognito You could do something in the Loaded Event of ControlA to walk up the visual tree to find a parent element for both controls, then walk down it and look for ControlB. –  Rachel May 31 '11 at 12:12

Do you mean you have two views, each with a UserControlFoo, and you want those two UserControlFoo instances to link to the same data? Like having a slider on two Views bound to the same data and when the one slider moves the other moves as well to reflect the change?

If that is the case, just bind both Views to the same ViewModel instance, make sure to raise OnPropertyChanged when the value changes and to set the bindings' UpdateSourceTrigger to PropertyChanged.

Here is an example that has two (or more) Views with sliders using the same ViewModel as DataContext:

In the ViewModel:

private double _sliderValue;
public double SliderValue
{
    get { return _sliderValue; }

    set
    {
        if (_sliderValue != value)
        {
            _sliderValue = value;

            OnPropertyChanged("SliderValue");
        }
    }
}

In the Views:

<Slider Value="{Binding Path=SliderValue, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}"/>

And then just have the same ViewModel as the DataContext for both Views

Does that answer your question?

If you are unfamiliar with OnPropertyChanged, check out Josh Smith's article: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419663.aspx

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I guess I didn't explain it very well. The situation is as follows: 2 different views and 2 different controls. Each control resides on separate view. ControlA has a dependency property of type ControlB. So I need to do something similar to element binding but the problem is that I don't have both elements in the same view. –  incognito May 31 '11 at 9:09
    
Ah OK so you actually have a Dependency Property on one control that IS another control. I don't know of a way to do that without some dirty dirty code behind and ViewModels knowing about their Views etc, sorry. –  Pieter Müller May 31 '11 at 10:35

Typically you would enable intra-view communication using the mediator pattern, and not via a dependency property. This allows you to develop the views and controls independently of one another, as a mediator will provide loose coupling between the views.

Assume you have 2 views, with View A containing Control A and View B containing Control B. You also have a view model for each view. The view model is where communication between views is going to occur by using a shared mediator. Alternately, you could add the mediator to each control as a dependency property and bind that property to the view model's mediator.

View A

  • Contains Control A
  • Has its DataContext set to ViewModel A
  • User interaction with Control A gets/sets view model properties using data binding
  • View model contains a shared reference to the mediator/messenger

View B

  • Contains Control B
  • Has its DataContext set to ViewModel B
  • User interaction with Control B gets/sets view model properties using data binding
  • View model contains a shared reference to the mediator/messenger

So when a user interacts with control A on view A, the interaction causes the mediator to publish a message that contains information about the event. The view model of view B is subscribed to be notified when this message is published, and updates its properties, which triggers a change in control B via data binding.

The mediator used by both view models is the same instance, often injected into the view models using an IoC container. Implementing a mediator is fairly trivial, and there are also several MVVM toolkits like MVVM Light that provide a 'Messenger' class that enables this sort of communication.

The key idea is that your views and controls no longer have any knowledge of each other, and instead interaction is abstracted as the publication and subscription of messages; facilitating loosely coupled communication between different objects and object types.

Mediator and MVVM resources:

  1. Simple Mediator
  2. MVVM Light Toolkit
  3. Implementing the MVVM Pattern
  4. Event Aggregation
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1  
I noticed your comment "I use third party controls and by design control A depends on control B. In my case they are put in separate views". Given that you don't have total control over the controls you are using, you may have to either forego using the MVVM pattern and leak knowledge of your views into your view model. The only other alternative I can think of is to write an abstraction that describes your controls, and use that in your view models. Can you link to the vendor that is providing your controls? –  Oppositional Jun 2 '11 at 0:23
    
Thank you for your great and detailed answer and even better comment. I ended up introducing the Control A to the Viewmodel A (which I didn't want to do in the beginning) and then I pass that Control A to the constructor of ViewModel B. This kind of solves the problem but causes some side effects. I really like the idea about the abstraction. Since there are more controls which depend on that Control A, I think I'm going to try that out. –  incognito Jun 2 '11 at 19:17
    
What side effects are you seeing? One issue I thought might be an issue is that user controls are usually DependencyObjects and have thread affinity, making it more difficult to perform work on a background thread. –  Oppositional Jun 2 '11 at 23:12

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