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I'm really new at GIT. My aim is to sync my Eclipse Projects between PC / Laptop - and I thought it would be a good Idea to use GIT for this. So I've set up my Repository, got it into Github, etc.

I have written a small Bash-Script which should do the sync work for me. It seems to work, but I'm not sure this is the best way to do:

#!/bin/bash          
# Github Syncro Script

# SoftwareProjekte
cd "D:\Projekte\Software Projekte"
git add . 
git commit -a -m "Auto-Git-Backup $(date "+%d.%m.%Y %H:%M "|sed -e ' s/\"/\\\"/g' )"
git push -u origin master
git pull

Is this a good Idea? Should I use something like http://code.google.com/p/git-sync/ instead? What bugs me about this script is that I have to enter my Password two times.

share|improve this question
    
I think git add . is redundant if you are using -a in your commit statement – zode64 May 30 '11 at 15:50
    
Easiest way to avoid the passwords, is to use an SSH key, and a ssh-agent to keep it in. – Douglas Leeder May 31 '11 at 13:23
    
@Douglas: How does this work? – Fannon May 31 '11 at 18:43
    
Actually I'm not sure how git interacts with ssh agents on Windows. You might have to experiment with putty's agent, or cygwin's ssh-agent to see if either of them can work. – Douglas Leeder Jun 1 '11 at 8:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I use scripts like this to work with git, it's nice because you can develop your custom script as you learn more features, there are other tools out there but it justy comes down to personal preference.

One thing I would say, to sync from git it's as simple as

git pull

If you are commiting to git first you should be doing a pull to reduce the risk of the local copy being an old version and creating conflicts.

Something like this:

cd "D:\Projekte\Software Projekte"
git pull
git add . 
git commit -a -m "Auto-Git-Backup $(date "+%d.%m.%Y %H:%M "|sed -e ' s/\"/\\\"/g' )"
git push -u origin master
share|improve this answer
    
This means, I shouldn't commit anything first, but just use git pull? – Fannon May 30 '11 at 14:48
    
Git pull doesn't commit anything to my remote Repo. So it's just to get the latest state which I had already commited by my other devices? – Fannon May 30 '11 at 15:28
    
wasn't clear in my answer so updated – zode64 May 30 '11 at 15:46
    
Your right git pull doesn't commit, but your script is commiting to repo which may have been updated by other device, you are best pulling in those changes to check everything is up-to-date before commiting – zode64 May 30 '11 at 15:48
    
Ok, thanks! This is a good hint! Another question: I still have to enter my Password 2-3 times for this one script. Is there a way to make this smarter? – Fannon May 30 '11 at 16:05

Now I think i've learned a bit about GIT and my new Syncro-Script looks like:

#!/bin/bash          
# Github Syncro Script

git pull
git add --all
git commit -m "Auto-Git-Backup $(date "+%d.%m.%Y %H:%M "|sed -e ' s/\"/\\\"/g' )"
git push -u origin master

git add --all seems better than commit -a because it adds new files and also removes deleted files.

It also looks like that I have to pull (and merge my remote changes with my own) before I can push my local changes. (In Case of Conflict)

Is this correct?

By the way: This article / graphic helped me a lot to understand how GIT Repositorys work: http://gitready.com/beginner/2009/01/21/pushing-and-pulling.html

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