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I need to write simple routine in iphone arm assembly (under xcode 4) (normal 32 bit not thumb) and have a problems (standalone asm routine do not link and with inline i have trouble with args and generall errors)

I need to assembly a function like

 void clear_alpha(unsigned char*bits, int width, int height)
{  for(int j=0; j<height; j++)
    for(int i=0; i<width; i++)
    {
        bits[j][i][4] = 0;
    }

}

or so, could anyone help, tnx

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You should state your reasons why this has to be rewritten in assembly. –  Nikolai Ruhe May 30 '11 at 14:48
    
@nikolai ruhe - 1) i want to learn iphone asm 2) do some testing once ago and found that memcpy()on iphone is about 15x faster than double for copy - it is because arm have commands to read and store 8 ints at once (and so on) - asm will be much faster, function above is slow –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 14:54
    
got more elaborate bit processing function in c and it takes 80 ms to execute and i have under 10fps framerate (so i hope to revrite it later in asm and achieve maybe something 3x faster or so) - but still had problems with such one simply asm (i am nevbie to iphone xcode and arm asm also) –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 14:58
    
memcpy won't help you with this -- it's a byte copy algorithm -- the bytes aren't contiguous -- so you can't take advantage of it. –  Lou Franco May 30 '11 at 14:59
    
@lou franco - yeas maybe, but if i had know iphone asm i could opt other routines too - so it is platinum worth learning in my opinion –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 15:22
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If this code is slow, why not try rewriting it

void clear_alpha(unsigned char*bits, int width, int height)
{  
   for(int j=0; j<height; j++)
      for(int i=0; i<width; i++)
      {
          bits[j][i][4] = 0; // this should be [3]
      }
}

Not sure what the optimizer did, but indexing is multiplying. You can replace 3 multiplies in the loop fairly easily

void clear_alpha(unsigned char*bits, int width, int height)
{  
   char *bits_ptr = bits + 3;
   char *bits_end = bits + height * width * 4;

   for(; bits_ptr < bits_end; bits_ptr += 4) {
       *bits_ptr = 0;
   }
}

I didn't run this -- check my work to make sure you don't overrun the end. Now instead of 3 multiplies, you have one add. I am assuming that your third dimension is 5 (edit: fixed based on comment), but you have to fix that if I'm wrong.

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tnx for answer (but still i want to try it in arm assembly) it should be 3 not for (it is my mistake) it is simple a rgba or bgra pixelmap[height][width][4] –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 15:01
    
franco - much thanx anyway (this is great ) –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 15:15
1  
Note though that it is highly likely that a optimizing compiler will generate equal code from both variants above so this modification may just make your code harder to read and not faster. –  Ville Krumlinde May 30 '11 at 17:00
    
@Ville Krumlinde - it is a matter of much doubt - some asm ppl say that it is never true and also that gcc arm asm generated is especially weak- at least it should be tested, if i had asm example i could measure it - so i need to know how to do it - some but not much info over the net, so if someone can answer my question, i would appreciate –  fiery firey May 30 '11 at 20:27
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See my answer to this ARM asm question, it shows how to conditionally compile ARM asm only when running on the device and compiling for ARM mode and not Thumb. The answer also shows a small example of passing C arguments into an ARM asm statement. You should use the simplified for loop mentioned above, then convert the instructions to ARM asm.

ARM asm example

Be aware that the compiler generated code for this example will likely be just as fast as any ASM you write. But, a good ASM coder will be able to do a lot better than the compiler when you get into more complex situations, mostly because gcc is not very good at making use of conditional ARM asm statements.

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how about memset(bits, 0, sizeof(unsigned char)*width*height);

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