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I'm still learning C and I must have misunderstood pointers at some point.

I was under the impression that the following lines would copy the memory address stored by l->first to temp. They are both struct list_el* pointers, so I can't see the problem.

struct list_elt * temp;
temp = l->first;

Running my sample code gives me an infinite loop:

user@machine:~$ gcc question.c 
user@machine:~$ ./a.out | head
append(): l->first->val: 30, l->first->next == NULL: 1
main()  : l->first->val: 30, l->first->next == NULL: 1
print() : l->first->val: 30, l->first->next == NULL: 1
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0
print() : temp->val: 30, temp->next == NULL: 0

Here's question.c. I'm sorry I couldn't narrow it down further, every time I do the problem seems to magically go away.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct list_elt {
    int val;
    struct list_elt * next;
};
struct linked_list {
    struct list_elt* first;
};

void print(const struct linked_list * l);
struct linked_list* new_list(void);
void append(struct linked_list* l, int value);


main()
{
    struct linked_list * l;
    l = new_list();
    append(l, 30);
    printf("main()  : l->first->val: %d, l->first->next == NULL: %d\n", l->first->val, l->first->next == NULL);
    print(l);
}

struct linked_list* new_list()
{
    struct linked_list* l;
    l = (struct linked_list*) malloc(sizeof(struct linked_list));
    l->first = NULL;
    return l;
}

void append(struct linked_list* l, int value)
{
    struct list_elt el = {0, NULL};
    el.val = value;
    el.next = NULL;
    if (l->first == NULL) {
        l->first = (struct list_elt*) &el;
        printf("append(): l->first->val: %d, l->first->next == NULL: %d\n", l->first->val, l->first->next == NULL);
    } else {
        printf("append(): Unimplemented\n");
    }
}


void print(const struct linked_list * l)
{
    printf("print() : l->first->val: %d, l->first->next == NULL: %d\n", l->first->val, l->first->next == NULL);
    struct list_elt * temp;
    temp = l->first;
    while (temp != NULL) {
        printf("print() : temp->val: %d, temp->next == NULL: %d\n", temp->val, temp->next == NULL);
        temp = temp->next;
    }
    printf("\n");
}

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
seems like homework : if it's the case, tag it correctly, otherwise, use a library ;-) –  Bruce May 30 '11 at 15:23
2  
Ugh! Don't name your objects l. If you must use a single letter, use any other letter (expect I, or O); but it's better to use more than 1 letter anyway. –  pmg May 30 '11 at 15:24
    
The problem did come up in the context of homework, go ahead and add the correct tag if you want. I actually finished the piece of homework by replacing el with a pointer and using malloc, but I wanted to know why this version doesn't work. –  Flimm May 30 '11 at 15:32
    
Single letter variable names are horrible, I agree, but believe it or not this actually common practise of more than one of my lecturers. I should have renamed it for stackoverflow's benefit, sorry! –  Flimm May 30 '11 at 15:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your append function is wrong. It is allocating el on the stack, and using the pointer in your list. The problem with this is that the memory is will be overwritten with garbage as soon as another function is called after append, in this case, print. Instead, allocate with malloc, something like:

int append(struct linked_list* l, int value)
{
    struct list_elt *el = malloc(sizeof(struct list_elt));

    if (el)
    {
        el->val = value;
        el->next = NULL;
        if (l->first == NULL) {
            l->first = el;
            printf("append(): l->first->val: %d, l->first->next == NULL: %d\n",
                   l->first->val, l->first->next == NULL);
        } else {
            printf("append(): Unimplemented\n");
        }

        return 0;
    }
    else
    {
        return 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that in C, it is considered good practice not to cast the return value of malloc(). –  Oliver Charlesworth May 30 '11 at 15:24
1  
and it's considered good practice to check if malloc returned 0 / NULL before trying to use pointer. –  Bruce May 30 '11 at 15:25
    
That makes a lot of sense. Is it possible to still keep el as it was, a list_elt struct, rather than a pointer to one? –  Flimm May 30 '11 at 15:28
    
@Bruce, good point, updated the code. –  Node May 30 '11 at 15:29
2  
@Flimm, el has to be a pointer, as the memory for the struct needs to be allocated by malloc. If you make it a value as you had done, the memory is allocated locally on the stack, and will be subject to being overwritten by another function call. –  Node May 30 '11 at 15:31

(What follows is a very simple explanation, so simple that it's arguably unprecise. I went for simplicity, but you can learn more by googling about the stack and the heap in C).

There are basically two ways to create things and store them in memory: use the stack, or request memory to the Operating System.

The stack is temporary memory, used to keep track of the current execution context. Every time you call a function, a sector of the stack is used to store all the local variables. This is what you're doing in append(): using temporary memory located in the stack to store your new list node.

Anything in the stack (any local variables) is considered lost in time and space when you return from the function, since the current execution context is no longer relevant, and this memory is reused for another context (the next function call, for example). This is unavoidable, it's a consequence of how this memory is managed, and it occurs outside your direct reach in C (or rather, you shouldn't mess with it).

When you want to store something outside this local scope, relevant to your program in general and not just to the current execution context, you must request additional memory to the operating system -- this temporary stack won't do. There are numerous functions for this -- check out the simplest, called malloc().

Hope it helped. Cheers!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That did help. All the guides on pointers that I've read don't explain the stack, so this was helpful. Is the stack the same as static memory allocation, or is the latter something different? –  Flimm May 30 '11 at 15:37
    
No, it's not the same. As I said, the stack is temporary and stores the execution context, it changes constantly in runtime. static memory is called static because it's reserved for you before execution really starts, and does not change during runtime. Declaring static variables, for example, will give you static memory space. –  uʍop ǝpısdn May 30 '11 at 15:40
    
+1: This is pretty accurate, actually. My only quibble is with the mention of "operating system". There isn't necessarily an OS involved in dynamic allocation. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 30 '11 at 15:41

In append, your element is created on stack and referenced later : this is wrong. When your function exits your el variable does not exist any more. You need to malloc your list_elt.

share|improve this answer

In append(), you are setting l->first to the address of a local stack variable, el. But el goes out of scope as soon as append() returns, so any attempt to dereference l->first afterwards is undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer

You are allocating your list_elt on the stack of the append function. this pointer is invalid once the function returns, and should no longer be referenced.

You should allocate your elements with malloc instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I use malloc without making el a pointer? –  Flimm May 30 '11 at 15:24
    
@Flimm: Just assign directly to l->first. i.e. l->first = malloc(sizeof(*l->first));. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 30 '11 at 15:27
    
@Flimm: As Oli Charlesworth says. also, you should check if malloc returned NULL before trying to dereference the pointer and set its fields. (you should also be doing this in your new_list function) –  Hasturkun May 30 '11 at 15:30

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