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I've just started playing around with higher-kinded types in Scala and I'm experiencing behavior that I do not understand. I'm doing all of this in the REPL on Scala 2.9.0.1.

First I create a mapper trait so that I can map over the elements of any type M:

 trait Mapper {
    def mapper[M[_], A, B](m: M[A], f: A => B): M[B]
 }

Here's my implementation of the mapper:

 val mymapper = new Mapper {
  def mapper[List, Int, Double](m: List[Int], f: Int => Double): List[Double] = m.map(f)
 }

But the REPL complains...

 <console>:9: error: List does not take type parameters
   def mapper[List, Int, Double](m: List[Int], f: Int => Double): List[Double] = m.map(f)
                                                                  ^
 <console>:9: error: List does not take type parameters
   def mapper[List, Int, Double](m: List[Int], f: Int => Double): List[Double] = m.map(f)
                                    ^

This code works fine if I move the declaration of M[_] to be at the class level:

trait Mapper[M[_]] {
  def mapper[A,B](m: M[A], f: A => B): M[B]
}
val mymapper = new Mapper[List] {
  def mapper[Int, Double](m: List[Int], f: Int => Double): List[Double] = m.map(f)
}
mymapper.mapper(List(1,2,3), (x: Int) => x.toDouble)
// returns List(1.0, 2.0, 3.0)

Why is this the case? Why is that Scala can figure out the correct type for M if it's located at a class-level, but fails at the method level?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This code does not mean what you think it means:

def mapper[List, Int, Double](m: List[Int], f: Int => Double): List[Double] = m.map(f)

List, Int and Double here are the names of type parameters, the exact types will be defined by the values used to call the method. Yes, they happen to also be the names of actual concrete types, but in this case you're shadowing that meaning.

If you use your original names of M, A and B, the error becomes clearer:

def mapper[M, A, B](m: M[A], f: A => B): M[B] = m.map(f)

M really does not take a type parameter...


It becomes even more obvious if you do the same thing with parameter names in your "working" example:

trait Mapper[M[_]] {
  def mapper[A,B](m: M[A], f: A => B): M[B]
}

val mymapper = new Mapper[List] {
  def mapper[A, B](m: List[A], f: A => B): List[B] = m.map(f)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Case in point, mymapper.mapper(List("1","2","3"), (x: String) => x.length) would also work when M is at the trait level. –  huynhjl May 30 '11 at 17:24
    
So in the first example (where I used method-level generics) my thinking went astray because it is up to the caller of the method to determine the concrete types. Therefore I can't say m.map() in the implementation because it is up to the caller to determine the type of m. In the second example, the mymapper implementation of the trait can define the concrete type of M[_], as it is at the class-level. However, the method-level types A and B (which I dubiously called Int and Double) are still ultimately determined by the caller. Thanks! –  shj May 30 '11 at 19:31

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