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public static Boolean cmprStr( String s1, String s2 )
{
    // STUFF
}

I want to iterate through s1 to make sure that every character in s1 is included in s2.

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case insensitive,or case sensitive? –  Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy May 30 '11 at 16:38
1  
Do you mean every character appears in both, or that they are both the same string? –  keyboardP May 30 '11 at 16:39
    
Every character in s1 appears in s2 –  Shamoon May 30 '11 at 16:41
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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
public static Boolean cmprStr( String s1, String s2 )
{
    for (int i = s1.length() - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
         if (s2.indexOf(s1.charAt(i)) == -1) {
             return Boolean.FALSE;
         }
    }
    return Boolean.TRUE;
}
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FYI this is O(n^2) –  sjr May 30 '11 at 17:12
2  
@Jim - I didn't see a homework tag. @sjr - I know. I see that you posted an O(n+m) solution. That's better asymptotically, but I wonder how long the strings need to be before it's better in practice. There's a lot of overhead in constructing HashSets like you do. –  Ted Hopp May 30 '11 at 17:29
    
There is no such method getChar but charAt –  Dejel Feb 20 '13 at 11:43
    
@Odelya - Good catch; now fixed. I've been programming in too many languages. –  Ted Hopp Feb 20 '13 at 16:02
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  for(char c: s1.toCharArray()){
     if(s2.indexOf(c) == -1){
           return false;
     }
  }
  return true;

Assuming that

  s1 = "aabb";
  s2 = "ccddaannbbss";

will return true.

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I think iterating a string using toCharArray will copy the string. This is probably less efficient than a simple for loop. –  ceving Jun 18 '13 at 8:42
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length()

will give you the length of a string

charAt( someIndex)

will give you the character at a given position, so you can iterate the first String.

indexOf( achar )

will give you the poisition a char in a String, or -1 if it's not there. hence you should be able to look for each character in the first string within the second.

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1  
+1 for providing the necessary pieces instead of doing his homework. –  delnan May 30 '11 at 16:50
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Why don't you simply use 'equals' method ?

Boolean b = s1.equals(s2);
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or s1.compareTo(s2) will provide you negative, zero, positive values. zero means equal. read j.mp/mONeBc –  ahmet alp balkan May 30 '11 at 16:45
1  
This doesn't do what the question asks, which is check that every character in s1 is also in s2. As stated, it shouldn't consider order or the number of times a character appears and this considers both. –  ColinD May 30 '11 at 16:47
1  
Unless I'm missing something (I must, after all five people voted for this), OP doesn't want to check if strings are equal but if for every character c in s1: c is in s2. -1 until I realize what I missed. –  delnan May 30 '11 at 16:48
    
Ah ! Ok sorry for the confusion ! –  0alpha0 May 30 '11 at 17:02
    
This answers the wrong question. –  Jim Ferrans May 30 '11 at 17:02
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Set<Character> charsInS1 = new HashSet<Character>();
for (int i = 0; i < s1.length(); i++) {
  charsInS1.add(s1.charAt(i));
}
for (int i = 0; i < s2.length(); i++) {
  charsInS1.remove(s2.charAt(i));
}
return charsInS1.isEmpty();

This has a complexity of O(n+m)... answers using indexOf have an O(n*m) complexity. It does of course use a bit of extra memory temporarily though.

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All the other answers are O(n^2). Here's a way that is linear in time (i.e. O(n)) using Google Guava:

  public static boolean cmprStr(String s1, String s2) {
    Set<Character> desiredCharacters = Sets.newHashSet(Lists.charactersOf(s2));
    return Sets.difference(Sets.newHashSet(Lists.charactersOf(s1)), desiredCharacters).isEmpty();
  }
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+1 for reducing asymptotic complexity to O(n+m). This would be good for very long strings. There's be less overhead in just constructing one HashSet and then iterating over the second string's characters looking for set membership. Also, heuristically it makes sense to hash the shorter string and then iterate over the longer. –  Ted Hopp May 30 '11 at 17:34
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Every String is also a CharSequence in Java. Therefore, you can easily iterate over a String using a simple for loop:

int n = s.length();
for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    char c = s.charAt(i);
    ...
}
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As I understand the question it would be.

//for each character in s1
  //if s2 does not contain character return false

//return true

for(int i = 0; i < length s1; i++){
  if(!s2.contains(String.valueOf(s1.charAt(i)))){
    return false;
  }
}
return true;

This verifies that each character in s1 is in s2. It does not confirm order, nor how many are there, and is not an equals method.

Recursive:

public static Boolean cmprStr( String s1, String s2 )
{
  if(s1.length() == 0 )
  {
    return true; 
  }
  if(!s2.contains(s1.substring(0,1)))
  {
    return false;
  }
  return cmprStr(s1.substring(1), s2);
}
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