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What is the difference between the following 2 queries? (They both produce the same results)

select *
from (
  select * from (
           select *
           from phppos_items
           where name like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16
           ) t
  union
  select * from (
           select *
           from phppos_items
           where item_number like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16
           ) t
  union
  select * from (
           select *
           from phppos_items
           where category like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16
           ) t
  ) as top_rows
order by `name` limit 16

vs

select *
from (
           (select *
           from phppos_items
           where name like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16)
  union
           (select *
           from phppos_items
           where item_number like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16)
  union
           (select *
           from phppos_items
           where category like 'AB10LA2%' and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16)
  ) as top_rows
order by `name` limit 16
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first version has another set of temporary tables, which is useless and a waste of resources in this specific case.
All the following will produce same result:

SELECT * FROM T1;

SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM T1);


SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM T1));

...
...

to infinity :-)

And in your very specific case this will be enough:

select *
           from phppos_items
           where 
                 (name like 'AB10LA2%' OR item_number like 'AB10LA2%' OR category like 'AB10LA2%')
           and deleted = 0
           order by `name` limit 16
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Temporary tables? Im pretty sure both queries will produce the same execution plan. –  Magnus May 30 '11 at 16:56
    
The original should not be giving priority to items found by name. –  Jonathan Leffler May 30 '11 at 17:01
    
@Jonathan Leffler you are right, edited –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 30 '11 at 17:04
    
@Magnus techincaly, each inner query in the FROM clause creates a temp-table. If MySql is smart enough to understand it is not needed here...we need to test it. –  Itay Moav -Malimovka May 30 '11 at 17:05
    
I am not doing the Or query because my indexes don't get used when using OR –  Chris Muench May 30 '11 at 18:32
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The only difference I see is the in the top one, the subquery components of the UNION are named. Obviously, since the second version doesn't error, MySQL doesn't require subquery names in this construction. BTW, have you tested that this version is faster than the corresponding single query using OR?

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The first query embeds an extra set of SELECT * FROM (sub-query). It will take slightly longer for the optimizer to sort it out.

Functionally, there is no real difference between the queries. The second is simpler and therefore preferable.

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