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This is the code

A = "Diga sí por cualquier número de otro cuidador.".encode("utf-8")

I get this error:

'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xed in position 6: ordinal not in range(128)

I tried numerous encodings unsuccessfully.

Edit:

I already have this at the beginning

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

Changing to

A = u"Diga sí por cualquier número de otro cuidador.".encode("utf-8")

doesn't help

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You can have a look at farmdev.com/talks/unicode for a more thorough explanation. –  Karol Piczak May 30 '11 at 17:13
    
there must be something you've left out? What OS are you running? What python version is installed? What text editor are you using? also see codepad.org/ZZgbOiw7 as this shows the answers below do work in python. –  James Khoury May 31 '11 at 3:40
1  
@James Khoury: The answers DON'T work if the source file is not encoded in UTF-8! Read my answer. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 9:20
    
@John Machin Sorry thats not what I meant. I hadn't seen your answer and I was responding to the edit in the question. I was trying to get some more info which to help find out exactly what was happening. –  James Khoury Jun 1 '11 at 0:01

6 Answers 6

Are you using Python 2?

In Python 2, that string literal is a bytestring. You're trying to encode it, but you can encode only a Unicode string, so Python will first try to decode the bytestring to a Unicode string using the default "ascii" encoding.

Unfortunately, your string contains non-ASCII characters, so it can't be decoded to Unicode.

The best solution is to use a Unicode string literal, like this:

A = u"Diga sí por cualquier número de otro cuidador.".encode("utf-8")
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You haven't noticed the 0xed in his error message :-( ... see my answer. –  John Machin May 30 '11 at 22:00

Error message: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xed in position 6: ordinal not in range(128)

says that the 7th byte is 0xed. This is either the first byte of the UTF-8 sequence for some (maybe CJK) high-ordinal Unicode character (that's absolutely not consistent with the reported facts), or it's your i-acute encoded in Latin1 or cp1252. I'm betting on the cp1252.

If your file was encoded in UTF-8, the offending byte would be not 0xed but 0xc3:

Preliminaries:
>>> import unicodedata
>>> unicodedata.name(u'\xed')
'LATIN SMALL LETTER I WITH ACUTE'
>>> uc = u'Diga s\xed por'

What happens if file is encoded in UTF-8:
>>> infile = uc.encode('utf8')
>>> infile
'Diga s\xc3\xad por'
>>> infile.encode('utf8')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc3 in position 6: ordinal not in range(128)
#### NOT the message reported in the question ####

What happens if file is encoded in cp1252 or latin1 or similar:
>>> infile = uc.encode('cp1252')
>>> infile
'Diga s\xed por'
>>> infile.encode('utf8')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xed in position 6: ordinal not in range(128)
#### As reported in the question ####

Having # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- at the start of your code does not magically ensure that your file is encoded in UTF-8 -- that's up to you and your text editor.

Actions:

  1. save your file as UTF-8.
  2. As suggested by others, you need u'blah blah'
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Having # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- in Emacs magically ensures you have UTF-8 encoding in current buffer... –  Xaerxess May 31 '11 at 11:30
    
@Xaerxess: As I said, it's uo to you and your text editor. Emacs is a text editor. It's not magic, it's called sensible code. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 12:38
    
+1 What confused me first with your argument was the fact the both cp1252 and unicode assign í to code point 0xed (237) - which I now think is merely coincidential. –  ThomasH May 31 '11 at 14:13

put on first line of your code this:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
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1  
I can confirm that this is working. –  Nicklas A. May 30 '11 at 17:09
    
-1 It should be obvious from the error message that his file is NOT encoded in UTF-8. See my answer. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 9:41
    
-1 for you @JohnMachin, I publish my response before you... if you want more point to help your reputation, do this helping another people, not give -1 for who just want to help. –  Ezequiel Bertti Oct 30 '11 at 23:48

You should specify your source file's encoding by adding the following line to the very beginning of your code (assuming that your file is encoded in UTF-8):

# Encoding: UTF-8

Otherwise, Python will assume an ASCII encoding and fail during parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 It should be obvious from the error message that his file is NOT encoded in UTF-8. See my answer. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 9:43
2  
Firstly, it's not obvious unless you can interpret character codes in one look. Secondly, I said "assuming that your file is encoded in UTF-8". If it is not, all he has to do is to change "UTF-8" it with the actual encoding, obviously. –  Eser Aygün May 31 '11 at 10:45
    
No, that's not all; he needs to add u. In any case, still -1: "fail during parsing" looks like this: SyntaxError: Non-ASCII character '\xed' in file fnodeccp1252.py etc etc etc -- obviously DIDN'T HAPPEN; he got a RUN-TIME error. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 21:24

You probably operate on normal string, not unicode string:

>> type(u"zażółć gęślą jaźń")
-> <type 'unicode'>

>> type("zażółć gęślą jaźń")
-> <type 'str'>

so

u"Diga sí por cualquier número de otro cuidador.".encode("utf-8")

should work.

If you want use unicode strings by default, put

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

in the first line of your script.

Look also in docs.

P.S. It's Polish in examples above :)

share|improve this answer
    
-1 It should be obvious from the error message that his file is NOT encoded in UTF-8. See my answer. –  John Machin May 31 '11 at 9:44
    
@John Machin: Forgot to add 'u' before string, that changes sense of my answer - I edited it, so it makes sense. –  Xaerxess May 31 '11 at 11:28

In the first or second line of your code, type the comment:

    # -*- coding: latin-1 -*-

For a list of symbols supported see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin-1_Supplement_%28Unicode_block%29

And the languages covered: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8859-1

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