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Starting version 3.0, Silverlight offers a local connection API that can be used to communicatie between Silverlight applications running on the same machine.

I would like to use this mechanism from a full blown .NET application; a .NET receiver with a Silverlight Sender. Unfortunately I can't find any "official" way of doing so. One thing that should be possible is embedding a WebBrowser component into my (WPF) application, which in turn hosts some Silverlight and tie the two together with some scripting, but that sounds extremely messy...

Is there a better way of doing this?

Edit:
Using sockets instead of the local connection API is not really an option, because I only want to communicate to applications in my current Windows session (in case of multiple RDP/Citrix users). Local connections seem to achieve this. Doing the same with sockets would require me to do some port negotiation or figure out which session I'm running in from Silverlight and I have no way of doing so.

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have you resolved this? – Boppity Bop Mar 20 '13 at 21:53
    
I've been unable to find a good solution for this. The only thing I could think of was to embed a Silverlight component in the application and delegate the communication to it, but that was not what I was looking for. – Thorarin Mar 21 '13 at 14:33
    
can you try to get user name as a unique token for a socket session? must be something.. but yeah I would like to have local connections in WPF too.... – Boppity Bop Mar 21 '13 at 20:24

I would go with the Socket way to make communication between the Silverlight app and the WPF(Any app for that matter Supports Sockets)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc296248(v=vs.95).aspx

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I can't use sockets, because I want to limit the communication to applications within a single Windows session. I've updated my question to clarify. – Thorarin May 30 '11 at 20:39

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