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I've been getting some weird results from basic css3. When I specify overflow-x:hidden; on an element, it adds a vertical scroll bar. The element overflows both x and y. I have tried adding overflow-y:visible; and even just overflow:visible, to no effect.

Is it possible that I'm just misunderstanding the spec?

This has happened on every browser I've tried.

Edit: Alright, it's been three years since I asked this question, and I'm not entirely sure what I was doing at the time, but I'd like to clarify that the intended effect was an element with a fixed height and width, and content which overflowed horizontally and vertically. Hiding the horizontal overflow, however, caused the vertical overflow to no longer appear outside the element, but instead be inside, with a scroll bar. I don't know if I could recreate the issue anymore.

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3  
You might want to paste some sample code at jsfiddle.net :) –  SalmanPK May 30 '11 at 19:00
    
x-axis = horizontal. y-axis = vertical. –  MarioRicalde May 30 '11 at 19:00
    
I just encountered this problem. Our designers want to create graphics which "flow" off the right edge. So I allow the image to overflow the container div, but then I set overflow hidden for the full-width row to clip the image and prevent a horizontal scrollbar for the entire page. The catch is, I also have a .row::after element which creates a shadow and uses absolute positioning to push it below the row, which overflow hidden will hide. overflow-x hidden; overflow-y:visible creates a scrollbar. I'd like the x to clip, and the y to overflow without a scrollbar. Similar to the poster's issue. –  Dustin Graham Mar 25 at 18:05
    
@Dustin Graham The scroll bars could be showing for the div or element outside the div/element you are styling. You may have to say overflow: visible for all the elements/divs containing this element/div. –  Frank Gorman May 13 at 5:36
    
Unfortunately, I went with a nested div to clip the image with overflow hidden. Then the parent div didn't need overflow hidden, so had no scroll bars while allowing the parent div to push the .row::after element down. –  Dustin Graham May 13 at 23:37

9 Answers 9

Just use overflow: hidden on a wrapper div with size constraints. Excuse my formatting in a bit of a rush today.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<style>
div.hidden 
{
background-color:#00FF00;
width:100px;
height:100px;
overflow:hidden;
}
div.overflowing
{
width:300px;
height:200px;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>
<p>overflow:hidden</p>
<div class="hidden">
<div class="overflowing">
You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.
You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.
You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.
You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

See it in action here: http://jsfiddle.net/4PZC9/

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Check out this answer to a related question: http://stackoverflow.com/a/6433475/3583023

It explains why

el {
  overflow-x: hidden;
  overflow-y: visible;
}

renders as

el {
  overflow-x: hidden;
  overflow-y: auto;
}

which usually renders the same as

el {
  overflow-x: hidden;
  overflow-y: scroll;
}

because the auto value of overflow-y is scroll in most browsers.

So, in order to achieve this effect, we can't use the overflow-x/overflow-y properties. I've experimented with the clip property as a potential alternative, but no luck so far: http://jsfiddle.net/qvEq5/

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Maybe you misunderstood something, I didn't unsdertood the question... or the problem is not in the overflow settings.

Overflow: auto will add the scrollbar only if needed (content bigger than container). Òverflow: visible will add the scrollbar. Òverflow: hidden will NOT add the scrollbar.

I understand that you want the x-content to be hidden, so overflow-x: hidden, but from your question it seems to me that don't want the vertical scrollbar to see the vertically overflowed content.

Maybe the problem is that is set a fixed height (or max-height) for the container and the content is bigger. Remove the height (or max height) and you'll avoid the vertical scrollbar.

...or as maybe I said, just didn't understood what is the desired effect.

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Give this a try:

height: auto;
width: 100px;
overflow: hidden;

Should keep the element at 100px wide, and allow it to expand vertically based on its content (without scrollbars).

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Firstly, this fiddle shows the problem which you describe.

As yet, I don't know how to get around this, but it seems like the spec hints to this here:

The computed values of ‘overflow-x’ and ‘overflow-y’ are the same as their specified values, except that some combinations with ‘visible’ are not possible: if one is specified as ‘visible’ and the other is ‘scroll’ or ‘auto’, then ‘visible’ is set to ‘auto’.

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Try setting your height. Either make it like 100%, or auto check this

jsfiddle

    height: auto;
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Try setting the display property? The overflow declaration works on block level elements!

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Martin J. Mar 25 at 17:49
    
How is that not an answer?! –  Kraken Mar 25 at 17:50
    
This is an auxiliary question, followed by a comment. stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer will give you a few pointers on how to provide good answers. –  Martin J. Mar 25 at 17:54
3  
I see...you can't explain why it isn't an answer, because it is, in fact, an answer. –  Kraken Mar 25 at 17:56

Try this,

height: auto;
overflow:hidden;

Cheers.

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Scrollbar needs fixed height –  Sagar Panchal Apr 1 at 11:05

Reading you question... I don't see any problem...

Whe I specify overflow-x:hidden; on an element, it adds a vertical scroll bar.

If it overflows in it's height (as you just said it does), then that's quite normal.

I have tried adding overflow-y:visible; and even just overflow:visible, to no effect.

Well... That's normal, as you're telling it to show a vertical scrollbar, wich there already is.

As kuloir said: X = horizontal; Y = vertical.

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1  
I am not telling it to add a vertical scrollbar. That would be overflow-y:scroll. I am telling it to simply appear outside of its box, but it instead is adding a scrollbar. Overflow-x:hidden is supposed to hide any content that goes out of the box horizontally, which it does, but it also adds a vertical scrollbar, which implies that it is affecting vertical overflow as well. –  William Kunkel May 31 '11 at 20:30
3  
I've come up against the same problem. This question stackoverflow.com/q/6421966/586748 explains why it's happening this way, but I still haven't found a way to work around it. Have you had any luck? –  Russell Oct 21 '11 at 10:31

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