Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to sort an array of this format, using plain old Javascript or jQuery:

var array = [6, 3, 18, 'four', 8, 'five', 6, 'nineteen', 'eight', 'two'];

// Write some javascript or jQuery code below to make sure that
// the integers in the array are correctly ordered from lowest
// to highest.

// Strings should be ignored, remaining in the same order.

// For example, the result for the array above should be:
// [3, 'four', 'five', 6, 6, 8, 18, 'nineteen', 'eight', 'two']

console.log(array);
share|improve this question
2  
Why are 'four' and 'five' in the second and third spots? – CanSpice May 30 '11 at 19:19
    
why is there a 'two' at the end? – LostLin May 30 '11 at 19:23
2  
your example result doesn't match the requirements – Patricia May 30 '11 at 19:26
    
@CanSpice and @Ellipsis...: The strings, 'two', 'four', and 'five' should be ignored. It probably would have been more clear had I used strings like 'asdf' and 'jkjk'. The value of the strings is not significant in the scope of the problem- just their order matters. @Patricia: My example defines the requirements. – Eric Freese May 31 '11 at 2:15
    
No, my point was that if you're ignoring the non-integers, then why do 'four' and 'five' get moved? Shouldn't the output array be [3, 6, 6, 'four', 8, 'five', 18, 'nineteen', 'eight', 'two']? – CanSpice May 31 '11 at 17:44

There are a few possible strategies.

Use an array of indices so that you have a layer of indirection -- create an array [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ...] and sort that with a custom comparator that dereferences 3 to array[3]. The dereferencing comparator might not obey the transitive property though so you run into undefined behavior. O(n) extra memory required.

var array = [6, 3, 18, 'four', 8, 'five', 6, 'nineteen', 'eight', 'two'];

// Create an array of indices.
var indices = [];
for (var i = array.length; --i >= 0;) { indices[i] = i; }
// indices is [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];

// Sort the indices, comparing by number of corresponding element iff
// corresponding elements are both numbers.
indices.sort(function (i, j) {
  var a = array[i], b = array[j];  // dereference
  if (a === (a | 0) && b === (b | 0)) {
    return a === b ? 0 : a < b ? -1 : 1;
  } else {
    return i - j;
  }
});

var newArray = [];
for (var i = array.length; --i >= 0;) { newArray[i] = array[indices[i]; }

array = newArray;

The other class of solutions is to extract the numbers, sort, and then replace which requires O(n) extra memory worst-case.

var array = [6, 3, 18, 'four', 8, 'five', 6, 'nineteen', 'eight', 'two'];

var integers = array.filter(function (x) { return x === (x | 0); });
integers.sort();

for (var i = 0, k = 0; k < integers.length; ++i) {
  if (array[i] === (array[i] | 0)) { array[i] = integers[k++]; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Mike, but the two options don't quite work. See the following jsfiddles: jsfiddle.net/ericfreese/XjtPY and jsfiddle.net/ericfreese/kMZ5b/1 – Eric Freese May 31 '11 at 2:29

Well, this question was pretty confusing, but after some thought, it seems to me that it's not possible to sort the array the way I was hoping to.

The best solution I came up with is to sort the items as they are added to the list, maintaining a valid array at every step in the process instead of trying to sort after the fact.

Feel free to post other answers. I'd love to see what people come up with. It's an interesting problem.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.