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I have to write C++ program, which will determine how many colors I should use to color undirected graph.

Also, I have to do this using algorithm from book "Foundations of Algorithms using C++ pseudocode".

Problem description: Determine all ways in which the vertices in an undirected graph can be colored, using only m colors, so that adjacent vertices are not the same color.

Input: positive integers n and m, and an undirected graph containing n vertices. The graph is represented by a two-dimensional array W, which has both its rows and columns indexed from 1 to n, where W [i] [j] is true if there is an edge between ith vertex and the jth vertex and false otherwise.

Output: all possible colorings of the graph, using at most m colors, so that no two adjacent vertices are the same color. The output for each coloring is an array vcolor indexed from 1 to n, where vcolor [i] is the color (an integer between 1 and m) assigned to the ith vertex.

There we have algorithm:

void m_coloring (index i)
{
    int color;
    if (promising (i))
        if (i == n)
            cout << vcolor [1] through vcolor [n];
        else
            for (color = 1; color <= m; color++){ // Try every
                vcolor [i + 1] = color;           // color for
                m_coloring (i + 1);               // next vertex.
            }
}

bool promising (index i)
{
    index j;
    bool switch;

    switch = true;
    j = 1;
    while (j && switch){                       // Check if an
        if (W[i][j] && vcolor[i] == vcolor[j]) // adjacent vertex
            switch = false;                    // is already
        j++;                                   // this color.
    }
    return switch;
}

And comment at the end: Following our usual convention, n, m, W, and vcolor are not inputs to either routine. In an implementation of the algorithm, the routines would be defined locally in a simple procedure that had n, m, and W as inputs, and vcolor defined locally. The top level call to m_coloring would be m_coloring( 0 )

I start to write my own implementation. First I want to say, that I'm not good C++ programmer, what is more, I usually use JS and PHP, weakly typed languages, so I'm sure there is a lot things I could do better. But it isn't main problem.

Problem is: the program above start to work, I write simple graph:

4 vertexes, 4 edges

1 2
1 3 2 3 3 4

Next, program start to use checkFor() (I planned to use it at for() for the every next number of colors, but for test purposes, I use it at static way, so I used 4.

Unfortunately, program launch m_coloring(), next launch promising() and... this is the end. I spend last three hours to find out, what I do wrong, maybe any more experienced programmer is able to explain me what I should do and / or what I do wrong...

Pleas help, thank you a lot.

My program code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

bool **W;
int n, m = 0;
int v, e = 0;
int x, y = 0;
int *vcolor;

bool promising (int i)
{
    int j = 1;
    bool switcher = true;

    while (j && switcher)
    {   
        if ( W[i][j] && vcolor[i] == vcolor[j] )
        {
            switcher = false;
        }

        j++;
    }

    return switcher;
}

void m_coloring (int i)
{
    int color;
    if ( promising (i) )
    {
        if (i == n)
        {
            cout << vcolor [1] << " through " << vcolor [n];
        }
        else
        {
            for (color = 1; color <= m; color++)
            {      
                vcolor [i + 1] = color;
                m_coloring(i + 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

void initArrays()
{
    for( int i = 0; i < n; i++ )
    {
        W[ i ] = new bool[ n ];
        vcolor[ i ] = 0;
    }
}

void fillW()
{
    for( int i = 0; i < n; i++ )
    {
        for( int j = 0; j < n; j++ )
        {
            if( !W[i][j] )
            {
                W[i][j] = false;
            }
        }
    }
}

void askForEdges()
{
    cout << "How many edges? ";
    cin >> e;
    cout << endl << "Write edges with pattern: [vertex_x][space][vertex_y]:" << endl;

    for( int i = 0; i < e; i++ )
    {
        cin >> x >> y;

        W[x][y] = true;
        W[y][x] = true;
    }
}

void specialMatrixPrint()
{
    cout << endl;
    int i, j;
    for( i = 0; i < n; i++ )
    {
        for( int j = 0; j < n; j++ )
        {
            cout << W[i][j] << " ";
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
}

void showEdgesMatrix()
{
    int i, j = 0;

    cout << endl << "    "; for( i = 1; i < n; i++ ) { cout << i << " "; } cout << endl;
    cout << endl << "    "; for( i = 1; i < n; i++ ) { cout << "# "; } cout << endl;

    for( i = 1; i < n; i++ )
    {
        cout << i << " # ";
        for( int j = 1; j < n; j++ )
        {
            if( W[i][j] == true ) { cout << "1 "; }
            else { cout << "0 "; }
        }

        cout << endl;
    }
}

void showVcolor()
{
    cout << endl;
    for( int i = 1; i < n; i++ )
    {
        cout << i << ": " << vcolor[ i ] << endl;
    }
}

void checkFor( int i )
{
    m = i;
    m_coloring( 0 );
}

int main()
{
    cout << "How many vertexes? " ;
    cin >> n;

    n += 1;

    W = new bool *[ n ];
    vcolor = new int[ n ];

    initArrays();
    askForEdges();
    showEdgesMatrix();

    checkFor( 4 );
    showVcolor();

    cin >> y;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
There is no bounds checking in promising. – Beta May 30 '11 at 20:15
    
Okay, I saw this before, but, when I put bounds checking: while (j && switcher) { if( j < k ) if ( W[i][j] && vcolor[i] == vcolor[j] ) { switcher = false; } j++; } else { switcher = false; } } program still do nothing. I also put bounds checking for: m_coloring( i + 1 ) if( !i + 1 < n ) it's doesn't help... – rude boy May 30 '11 at 20:24

There is a bug in the algorithm. In the function promising there is a nice array boundary overrun. They probably meant something like j < n or j <= n in the condition of the while statement. As written, the condition makes no sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Fine, I put while (j < n && switcher) but as I said above, it doesn't help. Output colors are: 0 0 0 0... – rude boy May 30 '11 at 20:40

You've got a whole bunch of problems, mostly in promising. Main thing to remember is that you want to compare only nodes which have had their color set, and not compare any node to itself. Also you can use the fact that the array was promising one recursion shallower and use inductive reasoning to avoid comparing all pairs.

Spoiler:

http://ideone.com/Lk0mg

share|improve this answer
    
Most powerful answer I ever seen. I tried to put your hints in to my code, I had something like you show at 'spoiler', but finally, I saw that your solution, which was very simple to main, work, but main still producing bad answers. Problem was, that (probably), I compile my program using VS2010, and there for example, boolean = false is casted to value 255, so it's bigger than 0 and pass while statment. – rude boy May 31 '11 at 13:40
    
Anyway, I'm very, very grateful. I will try to do my best at this portal because of your helpful answer, also in such late hour. Thank you. – rude boy May 31 '11 at 13:42
    
@rude boy: I didn't check every single answer produces by my version, but the first few seemed to be correct. And I assure you that if there are any problems, it's not because of the compiler. Your description sounds more like an uninitialized variable than anything else, which might work differently on different compilers, but is a bug in the program, not the compiler. – Ben Voigt May 31 '11 at 14:25
    
I thought that is mistake in my program, but... Just try to compile your program, which is work perfectly at ideon.com for various input data. Simple copy&paste, and it won't work correct after compile with VS2010 compiler, and work same as at ideon.com compiled with GCC 4.3.4. Just try. – rude boy May 31 '11 at 20:32
    
@rude boy: Your code is missing a call to fillW(). After adding that, it works correctly in VC2010. – Ben Voigt May 31 '11 at 20:39

the first time that the function m_coloring is called with i=1, vcolor[i+1] = color which is vcolor[2]=color and vcolor[1] is missed.. so the next time that it gets check by promising switch will return the value true always..

share|improve this answer

The algorithm is wrong.... Look at algorithm:

 void m_coloring (index i)
{
    int color;
    if (promising (i))
        if (i == n)
            cout << vcolor [1] through vcolor [n];
        else
            for (color = 1; color <= m; color++){ // Try every
                vcolor [i + 1] = color;           // color for
                m_coloring (i + 1);               // next vertex.
            }
/* HERE..................................*/
}

We should have another else statement at the bottom of algorithm to go for prodius another color for w[i] But it goes to the next level!!!!!!!!!.I think this is the problem

share|improve this answer

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