Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

How to combine several similar SELECT-expressions into a single expression?

   private static Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> CombineSelectors(params Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>>[] selectors)
    {

        // ???

        return null;
    }

    private void Query()
    {
        Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector1 = x => new AgencyDTO { Name = x.Name };
        Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector2 = x => new AgencyDTO { Phone = x.PhoneNumber };
        Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector3 = x => new AgencyDTO { Location = x.Locality.Name };
        Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector4 = x => new AgencyDTO { EmployeeCount = x.Employees.Count() };

        using (RealtyContext context = Session.CreateContext())
        {
            IQueryable<AgencyDTO> agencies = context.Agencies.Select(CombineSelectors(selector3, selector4));

            foreach (AgencyDTO agencyDTO in agencies)
            {
                // do something..;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
What would it do? – SLaks May 30 '11 at 21:02
    
Show the data in the list. This is necessary in order to avoid loading unnecessary fields from the database. – Boris Mitchenko May 30 '11 at 21:07
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Not simple; you need to rewrite all the expressions - well, strictly speaking you can recycle most of one of them, but the problem is that you have different x in each (even though it looks the same), hence you need to use a visitor to replace all the parameters with the final x. Fortunately this isn't too bad in 4.0:

static void Main() {
    Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector1 = x => new AgencyDTO { Name = x.Name };
    Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector2 = x => new AgencyDTO { Phone = x.PhoneNumber };
    Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector3 = x => new AgencyDTO { Location = x.Locality.Name };
    Expression<Func<Agency, AgencyDTO>> selector4 = x => new AgencyDTO { EmployeeCount = x.Employees.Count() };

    // combine the assignments from the 4 selectors
    var convert = Combine(selector1, selector2, selector3, selector4);

    // sample data
    var orig = new Agency
    {
        Name = "a",
        PhoneNumber = "b",
        Locality = new Location { Name = "c" },
        Employees = new List<Employee> { new Employee(), new Employee() }
    };

    // check it
    var dto = new[] { orig }.AsQueryable().Select(convert).Single();
    Console.WriteLine(dto.Name); // a
    Console.WriteLine(dto.Phone); // b
    Console.WriteLine(dto.Location); // c
    Console.WriteLine(dto.EmployeeCount); // 2
}
static Expression<Func<TSource, TDestination>> Combine<TSource, TDestination>(
    params Expression<Func<TSource, TDestination>>[] selectors)
{
    var zeroth = ((MemberInitExpression)selectors[0].Body);
    var param = selectors[0].Parameters[0];
    List<MemberBinding> bindings = new List<MemberBinding>(zeroth.Bindings.OfType<MemberAssignment>());
    for (int i = 1; i < selectors.Length; i++)
    {
        var memberInit = (MemberInitExpression)selectors[i].Body;
        var replace = new ParameterReplaceVisitor(selectors[i].Parameters[0], param);
        foreach (var binding in memberInit.Bindings.OfType<MemberAssignment>())
        {
            bindings.Add(Expression.Bind(binding.Member,
                replace.VisitAndConvert(binding.Expression, "Combine")));
        }
    }

    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, TDestination>>(
        Expression.MemberInit(zeroth.NewExpression, bindings), param);
}
class ParameterReplaceVisitor : ExpressionVisitor
{
    private readonly ParameterExpression from, to;
    public ParameterReplaceVisitor(ParameterExpression from, ParameterExpression to)
    {
        this.from = from;
        this.to = to;
    }
    protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
    {
        return node == from ? to : base.VisitParameter(node);
    }
}

This uses the constructor from the first expression found, so you might want to sanity-check that all of the others use trivial constructors in their respective NewExpressions. I've left that for the reader, though.

Edit: In the comments, @Slaks notes that more LINQ could make this shorter. He is of course right - a bit dense for easy reading, though:

static Expression<Func<TSource, TDestination>> Combine<TSource, TDestination>(
    params Expression<Func<TSource, TDestination>>[] selectors)
{
    var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TSource), "x");
    return Expression.Lambda<Func<TSource, TDestination>>(
        Expression.MemberInit(
            Expression.New(typeof(TDestination).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes)),
            from selector in selectors
            let replace = new ParameterReplaceVisitor(
                  selector.Parameters[0], param)
            from binding in ((MemberInitExpression)selector.Body).Bindings
                  .OfType<MemberAssignment>()
            select Expression.Bind(binding.Member,
                  replace.VisitAndConvert(binding.Expression, "Combine")))
        , param);        
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for writing all that code. It could be made much simpler by replacing the nested loop with LINQ calls and a new Parameter – SLaks May 30 '11 at 21:40
    
@Slaks maybe, maybe. It was already complex enough though - the reader probably has more chance to grok it in a more procedural layout – Marc Gravell May 30 '11 at 21:41
    
@Slaks - adding, just for fun – Marc Gravell May 30 '11 at 21:47
    
Thanks! Works like a charm. – Boris Mitchenko May 30 '11 at 22:07

If all of the selectors will only initialize AgencyDTO objects (like your example), you can cast the expressions to NewExpression instances, then call Expression.New with the Members of the expressions.

You'll also need an ExpressionVisitor to replace the ParameterExpressions from the original expressions with a single ParameterExpression for the expression you're creating.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually it is MemberInitExpression (the NewExpression is just the ctor); it can be done though (added) – Marc Gravell May 30 '11 at 21:36

Wouldn't this very simple extension method do the trick in a far more simple manner ?

public static IEnumerable<TOut> MultiSelect<TIn, TOut>(this IEnumerable<TIn> source, params Func<TIn, TOut>[] selectors)
{
    foreach (TIn item in source)
    {
        foreach (var selector in selectors)
        {
            yield return selector(item);
        }
    }
}

I highly respect Marc Gravell and suspect his answer is right and mine not, and there's something I must miss here... Could someone explain me what please ?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.