Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this list of type IEnumerable<MyBaseType> for which I am trying to create an extra where-clause to retrieve a specific item in the list. The specific value does only exist on subtype MyFirstType and MySecondType. Not on MyBaseType.

Is it possible to create an expression kind of...

MyList.Where(b => (b is MyFirstType || (b is MySecondType)) && b.SpecificValue == message.SpecificValue);

Above is not working since b is of type MyBaseType and SpecificValue does not exist there. Also note that I do have another subtype MyThirdType that neither has the SpecificValue.

What does work doing what I want is this...

foreach (dynamic u in MyList)
{
    if (u is MyFirstType || u is MySecondType)
    {
        if (u.SpecificValue == message.SpecificValue)
        {
            //Extracted code goes here
            break;
        }
    }
}

Anyone have an idea how to create an linq expression for the above scenario?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The direct translation of your code to a Linq where clause is

string messageValue = "foo";
var result = baseList.Where(item =>
{
    dynamic c = item;
    if(item is MyFirstType || item is MySecondType)
    {
        if( c.SpecificValue == messageValue)
            return true;
    }
    return false;
});

This will require testing the type of the class though and using dynamic - so you might as well cast item to either MyFirstType or MySecondType directly.

An alternative would be using reflection to check if the property exists, using this approach you are not dependent on the actual types of your items as long as they do have the property you are interested in:

string messageValue = "foo";
var result = baseList.Where( item => 
    {
        var prop =  item.GetType().GetProperty("SpecificValue");
        if (prop != null && prop.GetValue(item, null) == messageValue)
            return true;
        else return false;
    });

If modifying the class hierarchy is an option you can have you MyFirstType or MySecondType implement an interface that holds the property, then you can use OfType() in your Linq query:

interface ISpecific
{
    string SpecificValue { get; set; }
}
class MyFirstType : MyBase, ISpecific
{
    public string SpecificValue { get; set; }
}
...
string messageValue = "foo";
var result = baseList.OfType<ISpecific>()
                     .Where(item => item.SpecificValue == messageValue);
share|improve this answer
    
I actually go for the first version with dynamic. Thanks! –  Per May 31 '11 at 7:07

Maybe there is a better solution but as I see it, this could work well enough... If you don't mind performance.

Well then, start by declaring an interface:

public interface IMySpecialType
{
   object SpecificValue {get; set;} //you didn't specify what type this is
   //all your other relevant properties which first and second types have in common
}

Then, make MyFirstType and MySecondType derive from this interface:

public class MyFirstType : MyBaseType, IMySpecialType
{
   //snipet
}

public class MyFirstType : MySecondType, IMySpecialType
{
   //snipet
}

Then, filter and cast:

MyList
    .Where(b => (b is MyFirstType) || (b is MySecondType))
    .Cast<IMySpecialType>()
    .Where(b => b.SpecificValue == message.SpecificValue);
    //do something
share|improve this answer

A far more easy way to do that would be to create an interface to mark all your classes having this property SpecificValue. Then it's a child play :

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<MyBaseType> MyList = new List<MyBaseType>();
        ISpecificValue message = new MyFirstType();
        MyList.OfType<ISpecificValue>().Where(b => b.SpecificValue == message.SpecificValue);
    }
}

class MyBaseType { }
interface ISpecificValue { string SpecificValue { get; set; } }
class MyFirstType : MyBaseType, ISpecificValue
{
    public string SpecificValue;
}
class MySecondType : MyBaseType, ISpecificValue
{
    public string SpecificValue;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ooops ! I had not noticed Francisco's similar answer. I prefer mine because the built-in OfType seems more elegant to me than this strange combination of Where and Cast where the implementing types MyFirstType and MySecondType are hard-coded. –  Ssithra May 31 '11 at 14:17
    
Noticed your answer similar to Francisco. Yes, it sure is simple but I don't want to introduce yet another interface. –  Per Jun 1 '11 at 4:41
    
I highly respect this wish. Nevertheless, I wouldn't hesitate to do so. It's how the whole .Net framework is conceived : abstraction whenever possible, interfaces rather than classes... The cost in creating this new one-liner interface is negligible, the interface's purpose is not difficult to understand (thanks to a self-explanatory name), and it garantuees the maintainability of your code. If additional classes with a SpecificValue property should appear in the future, you wouldn't have to modify your code to hard-code this new class in the Where clause test. –  Ssithra Jun 1 '11 at 8:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.