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Consider the following wrapper function that retrys a given function some given number of times if the function throws (not sure why the formatting is wonky):


sub tryit{
    my $fun = shift;
    my $times = shift;
    my @args = @_;
    my $ret;
    do{  
    $times--;
    eval{
        $ret = $fun->(@args);
    };
    if($@){
        print "Error attemping cmd: $@\n";
    }
    else{
         return $ret;
    }
    }while($times > 0);
    return;

}

How can this be extended so that the return value of the parameter function is properly propigated up no matter what kind of value is returned? For instance, this function won't pass an array up properly. You can't just return $fun->() because the return only takes you out of the eval block.

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Can you provide more detail on the problem? What happens, for instance, when the return value is an array? –  Greg May 30 '11 at 23:54
    
@greg If the return value is an array then $ret gets assigned the last element –  frankc May 31 '11 at 0:19
    
The return value from a function is NEVER an array. It may be a list or a reference to an array though. –  tadmc May 31 '11 at 3:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do this with wantarray. (It is formatting wonky for me, too; sorry)

sub tryit{
    my $fun = shift;
    my $times = shift;
    my @args = @_;
    my $array_wanted = wantarray;
    my $ret;
    my @ret;
    do{  
    $times--;
    eval{
        if ($array_wanted) {
            @ret = $fun->(@args);
        }
        else {
            $ret = $fun->(@args);
        }
    };
    if($@){
        print "Error attemping cmd: $@\n";
    }
    else{
         if ($array_wanted) {
             return @ret;
         }
         else {
             return $ret;
         }
    }
    }while($times > 0);
    return;

}

I am sure a monster Perl hacker could find a way to tighten this up, but that is the basic idea.

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1  
We wrote almost the same, down to the documentation link :) I'll retract my answer and upvote yours. –  Emilio Silva May 31 '11 at 0:07
2  
If you wanted to be evil, you could change $ret to $ret[0] and remove the scalar $ret variable entirely. Also, you might want to account for the scenario where wantarray returns undef. –  Chris Lutz May 31 '11 at 0:23
    
@Emilio: +1 for great minds thinking alike –  Nemo May 31 '11 at 0:29
2  
$list_wanted is what wantarray returns. If you don't use $wantarray for consistency, might as well use the correct terminology. It's impossible for a function to return an array. –  ikegami May 31 '11 at 0:29

Same basic answer as Nemo, but with some improvements:

  • Safer exception handling.
  • The exception of the last try isn't caught.
  • Error sent to STDERR.
  • Extra newline removed.
  • Cleaner loop.
  • Better variable names.

wantarray will get you the information you need.

sub tryit {
    my $func        = shift;
    my $attempts    = shift;
    my $list_wanted = wantarray;
    my @rv;
    for (2..$attempts) {
        if (eval{
            if ($list_wanted) {
                @rv = $func->(@_);
            } else {
                $rv[0] = $func->(@_);
            }
            1  # No exception
        }) {
            return $list_wanted ? @rv : $rv[0];
        }

        warn($@, "Retrying...\n");
    }

    return $func->(@_);
}

Void context gets propagated as void context, but that's probably acceptable. If not, it's easy to adjust.

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