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I want to read a file and detect if the character after the symbol is a number or a word. If it is a number, I want to delete the symbol in front of it, translate the number into binary and replace it in the file. If it is a word, I want to set the characters to number 16 at first, but then, if another word is used, I want to add the 1 to the original number. Here's what I want:

If the file name reads (... represents a string that does not need to be translated):

%10
...
%firststring 
...
%secondstring
...
%firststring
...
%11
...

and so on...

I want it to look like this:

0000000000001010 (10 in binary)
...  
0000000000010000 (16 in binary)
...
0000000000010001 (another word was used, so 16+1 = 17 in binary)
...
0000000000010000 (16 in binary)
...
0000000000001011 (11 in binary)

And here's what I tried: anyLines is just a string array which has the contents of the file (if I were to say System.out.println(anyLines[i]), I would the file's contents printed out).


UPDATED!

    try {
       ReadFile files = new ReadFile(file.getPath());
       String[] anyLines = files.OpenFile();

        int i;


    int wordValue = 16;

// to keep track words that are already used
Map<String, Integer> wordValueMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

for (String line : anyLines) {
// if line doesn't begin with &, then ignore it
if (!line.startsWith("@")) {
    continue;
}

// remove 
line = line.substring(1);

Integer binaryValue = null;

if (line.matches("\\d+")) {
    binaryValue = Integer.parseInt(line);
}
else if (line.matches("\\w+")) {
    binaryValue = wordValueMap.get(line);


    // if the map doesn't contain the word value, then assign and store it
    if (binaryValue == null) {
        binaryValue = wordValue;
        wordValueMap.put(line, binaryValue);
        ++wordValue;
    }
}

// I'm using Commons Lang's StringUtils.leftPad(..) to create the zero padded string
   System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(binaryValue));

}

Now, I only have to replace the symbols (%10, %firststring, etc) with the binary value.

After executing this code, what I get as the output is:

1010 
10000 
10001
10000
1011
%10
...
%firststring 
...
%secondstring
...
%firststring
...
%11
...

Now I just need to replace the %10 with 1010, the %firststring with 10000 and so on, so that the file would read like this:

0000000000001010 (10 in binary)
...  
0000000000010000 (16 in binary)
...
0000000000010001 (another word was used, so 16+1 = 17 in binary)
...
0000000000010000 (16 in binary)
...
0000000000001011 (11 in binary)

Do you have any suggestions on how to make this work?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Reading characters and checking if they're a number –  trashgod May 31 '11 at 1:10
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1 Answer

This may not be doing what you think it's doing:

 int binaryValue = wordValue++;

Because you are using the post-increment operator, binary value is being assigned the old worldValue value, and then worldValue is incremented. I'd do this on two separate lines with the increment being done first:

 wordValue++;
 int binaryValue = wordValue; // binaryValue now gets the new value for wordValue

EDIT 1
OK, if you still need our help, I suggest you do the following:

  • Show us a sample of the data file so we can see what it actually looks like.
  • Explain the difference between the anyLines array and the lines array and how they relate to the data file. They both have Strings, and lines is obviously the result of splitting anyLines with "\n" but what again is anyLines. You state that the file is a text file, but how do you get the initial array of Strings from this text file? Is there another delimiter that you use to get this array? Have you tried to debug the code by printing out the contents of anyLines and lines?
  • If you need wordValue to persist with each iteration of a loop through anyLines (again, knowing what this is would help), you will need to declare and initialize it before the loop.
  • If you can't create and post an SSCCE, at least make your code formatting consistent and readable, something like the code below.
  • Have a look at the link on how to ask smart questions for more tips on information that you could give us that would help us to help you.

Sample code formatting:

  try {
     ReadFile files = new ReadFile(file.getPath());
     String[] anyLines = files.OpenFile();

     String[] anyLines = {};

     int i;

     // test if the program actually read the file
     for (i = 0; i < anyLines.length; i++) {

        String[] lines = anyLines[i].split("\n");
        int wordValue = 76;

        Map<String, Integer> wordValueMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

        for (String currentLine : lines) {
           if (!currentLine.startsWith("%")) {
              continue;
           }

           currentLine = currentLine.substring(1);
           Integer value;

           if (currentLine.matches("\\d+")) {
              value = Integer.parseInt(currentLine);
           } else if (currentLine.matches("\\w+")) {
              value = wordValueMap.get(currentLine);

              if (value == null) {
                 int binaryValue = wordValue++;
                 wordValueMap.put(currentLine, binaryValue);
                 // TODO: fix below
                 // !! currentLine.replace(currentLine, binaryValue);

                 value = binaryValue;
              }
           } else {
              System.out.println("Invalid input");
              break;
           }

           System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(value));
        }
     }
  } finally {
     // Do we need a catch block? If so, catch what?
     // What's supposed to go in here?
  }

Luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Your method only increments the first value and doesn't increment the rest. Your method is increasing the first %word value (setting it to 17) and the rest of the values are %17. I want it to be %word = 16, %word2 = 17, %word3 = 18, %word = 16, and so on. –  rudna1010 May 31 '11 at 1:22
    
@rudna1010: LOL, it's not my method, it's yours. That means you have other bugs. Since wordValue is initialized inside of the method, what did you expect this would do? If you want wordValue to persist whenever the method is called, then it has to exist outside of the method (be a class-level variable) and not be initialized inside of the method. Understand that no one here can test this code other than you, since you have the rest of the program. Keep at it. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 31 '11 at 1:25
    
I'm trying to loop through the file line by line. @ Hovercraft Full Of Eels, wordValue is just the value of the first word that's detected after the % symbol, which is 16. –  rudna1010 May 31 '11 at 1:27
    
You may wish to create an sscce, a small program that we can compile, run, modify and debug. Also there are other issues in your code that prevent it from compiling -- for one a String#replace that's receiving an int parameter. Also replace doesn't change the String that calls it but rather returns a new String, so you'll need to fix that. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 31 '11 at 1:32
1  
Minor note about int binaryValue = wordValue++; -- it isn't because of operator precedence, but because x++ means post-increment. As opposed to pre-incrementing with int binaryValue = ++wordValue; –  trutheality May 31 '11 at 3:36
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