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I made 3D graphics, and using the known method of zooming, which is to hold the Ctrl and now slide the mouse up and down to zoom in and out as described here

http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/howto/RotateZoomAndPanGraphics.html

This works ok.

But now I issue the command Rotate[g,90 Degree], and try to zoom on the generate plot (in the new output cell). But the zoom no longer works on that new rotated image.

I see it blinking black each time I slide the mouse, but it does not zoom in nor out.

Here is the command

     g=Graphics3D[ Cuboid[{-.1,-.1,-.1},{.1,.1,.1}],
        AxesOrigin->{0,0,0},
        PlotRange->{{-1,1},{-1,1},{-1,1}},
        Axes->True,
        AxesLabel->{"X","Y","Z"},
        ViewPoint->Front,
        Ticks->None]

now zoom works ok. Now type

 Rotate[g,90 Degree]

Now try zoom on the result of the above command. It does not work.

version 8.0.1, windows 7

thanks

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In Mathematica 7.0.1 under Windows 2000 zooming and rotating works although at the time of doing this I often see two versions of the plot - rotated and not - at the same time. I also see some other artifacts and sometimes cannot see the plot during interactive rotation at all. –  Alexey Popkov May 31 '11 at 4:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are right, there is a bug in the interface.

After a few tries, pressing Ctrl and the mouse buttons, I was able to get a weird display:

enter image description here

And the zooming works (although inconsistently), but ... moving the mouse left to right!

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Same here... Check out rotating 360 degrees, and rotating 359 degrees :) Meanwhile, rotating 361 degrees apparently causes Mathematica to be more prone to crashing. –  irrelephant May 31 '11 at 2:09
    
I think I see something now which might explain this weirdness. After the Rotate[] command, Simply now click on the plot to select it, now we see the little orange boundary lines around the image, now try to resize the image with the mouse by reaching to the corner to grab it with the mouse. you will notice the mouse indicator has also rotated 90 degrees! One can still resize the image, but it looks strange, since mouse end on the screen is now at 90 degree slant compared to the previous image before Rotate[]. I also noticed Rotate[] result has Head[] Rotate, I thought it will be Graphics3D –  Nasser May 31 '11 at 2:33
    
Mma makes the World go around :) –  belisarius May 31 '11 at 2:38

I think this is either an abusive or unanticipated use of the Rotate command, depending on your perspective.

Rotate creates a RotationBox wrapper that instructs the FrontEnd (I believe) to rotate it's contents. When you apply this to an object with its own rotation controls, you have conflicting methods.

Generally speaking, Rotate should not be used on dynamic elements. Consider this modified example from the documentation:

DynamicModule[{p1 = {0, 0}, p2 = {1, 0}, p3 = {0, 1}},
 {Framed@
   Graphics[Polygon[{Dynamic[p1], Dynamic[p2], Dynamic[p3]}], 
    PlotRange -> 1], 
  Column[
   {Slider2D[Dynamic[p1], {-1, 1}], 
    Slider2D[Dynamic[p2], {-1, 1}]~Rotate~(Pi/2), 
    Slider2D[Dynamic[p3], {-1, 1}]}]}]

enter image description here

Notice the strange behavior of the middle slider (try it), and also notice that its appearance is wrong. The latter is further indication that this use is noncanonical.

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