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I'm having trouble with Project Euler's problem 12. My code is correctly generating the series, as far as I can tell, and it gets the correct solution to the test problem. I don't believe that long is getting overflowed because it does return a solution, just not the correct one. Any thoughts?

The sequence of triangle numbers is generated by adding the natural numbers. So the 7th triangle number would be 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 28. The first ten terms would be:

1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, 28, 36, 45, 55, ...

Let us list the factors of the first seven triangle numbers:

1: 1 3: 1,3 6: 1,2,3,6 10: 1,2,5,10 15: 1,3,5,15 21: 1,3,7,21 28: 1,2,4,7,14,28 We can see that 28 is the first triangle number to have over five divisors.

What is the value of the first triangle number to have over five hundred divisors?

class Program
{
    static long lastTriangle = 1;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        long x = 1;
        do
        {
            x = nextTriangle(x);
            Console.WriteLine(x);
        } while (numDivisors(x) < 500);

        Console.WriteLine(x);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static long nextTriangle(long arg)
    {
        lastTriangle += 1;
        long toReturn = lastTriangle + arg;
        return toReturn;
    }

    static long numDivisors(long arg)
    {
        long count = 0;
        long lastDivisor = 0;
        Boolean atHalfWay = false;
        for (long x = 1; x <= arg && !atHalfWay; x++)
        {
            if (arg % x == 0 && x != lastDivisor)
            {
                count++;
                lastDivisor = arg / x;
            }
            else if (x == lastDivisor)
            {
                atHalfWay = true;

            }
        }
        return count*2;
    }
}
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

If x is a square numDivisors counts the square root of x twice.

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I added the code ' if (Math.Sqrt(arg) % 1 == 0) return count * 2 - 1;' to account for squares. I'm getting a different but stil incorrect solution. – humanstory May 31 '11 at 5:11
    
That's not the right condition. – trutheality May 31 '11 at 5:17
    
I'll rework it - thanks for putting me on the right path! – humanstory May 31 '11 at 5:23
1  
Actually, I just realized what you were doing with that condition, and it should work in principle, but because Sqrt returns a double it might not be exact. I think if(lastDivisor*lastDivisor == arg) is a safer test. – trutheality May 31 '11 at 5:32

The problem isn't that the square roots of perfect squares are counted twice. When arg is a square, numDivisors(arg) gives a completely wrong answer, not just one off. Consider arg = 36. When x = 4, lastDivisor gets set to 9. Next iteration, x = 5;

if (36 % 5 == 0 && 5 != 9) // 36 % 5 == 1
else if (5 == 9)
// Nothing done, next x
if (36 % 6 == 0 && 6 != 9) // true
{
    count++;
    lastDivisor = 36 / 6; // 6
}
// next x
if (36 % 7 == 0 && 7 != 6) // 36 % 7 == 1
else if (7 == 6)
// next x

Now x will never equal lastDivisor and the loop runs until x == 36, so all divisors are counted twice.

Another mistake your condition while (numDivisors(x) < 500), the problem asks for the first triangle number with more than 500 divisors, if there was one with exactly 500 divisors before, you'd find that.

Exercise for the reader: why is it - in the problem as stated - not necessary to check for squares and count the square root only once?

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