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Say I have a number 0 that corresponds to the ASCII character a. How would I go about converting a number in the range 0 to 25 to letters in the alphabet?

I have already tried adding 97 to the decimal value, but it just outputs the number+97.

typedef enum {
    a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z
} set;

void dispSet(set numbers[], int size_numbers) {
  int i;
  printf("[ ");
  for (i = 0; i < size_numbers-1; i++) {
    printf("%d, ", ((char) numbers[i])+97);
  }
  printf("%d ]", ((char) numbers[size_numbers-1])+97);
  printf("\n");
}
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1  
Should should be pasing '%c' to printf, not %d –  forsvarir May 31 '11 at 4:59
    
wow...smooth on my part. thank you! –  tekknolagi May 31 '11 at 5:01
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should should be pasing %c to printf, not %d. The format specifier, tells printf how to interpret the supplied paramters. If you pass %d, it will interpret the arguments as an integer. By specifying %c, you tell it to interpret the argument as a character. The manpages / help for printf, eventually lead to some 'format specifiers', which gives you the full list.

Personally, I tend to use someValue + 'a', or someValue + 'A', because I find it a bit easier to follow the code.

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The algorithm is to 'a' to your numbers, which you have already done by adding 97. However you should use character specifier instead of the decimal specifier in the printf

 printf("%c", numbers[i] + 'a');

This will the ascii character not the decimal representation to the 'console'.

Also, you do not need typedef.

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A more general solution doesn't assume ASCII but works with the compiler's execution character set.

char *vec = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
printf("'%c'", vec[0]); //prints 'a'

And you can reverse the operation

int i = strchr(vec, 'm')-vec;

Since strchr returns a pointer to the character, subtracting the base yields a ptrdiff_t representing the offset between the two "points", this offset is the ordinal of the member of the sequence. But only if the character is present, otherwise it's undefined behavior to take a ptrdiff from two addresses that are not part of the same 'object'; you'd probably get a meaningless negative number.

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@forsvarir Thanks for the edit! Much better. –  luser droog Jun 23 '11 at 5:56
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void dispSet(set numbers[], int size_numbers) {
  int i;
  printf("[ ");
  for (i = 0; i < size_numbers-1; i++) {
    printf("%d, ", ((char) numbers[i]) - '0');
  }
  printf("%d ]", ((char) numbers[size_numbers-1]) - '0');
  printf("\n");
}

This change converts a number or any character to its ASCII value

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You can use Character.toChars(x + 97)[0] to get the char value, or just cast with (char) (x + 97).

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1  
Question is tagged as C. –  Naveen May 31 '11 at 5:05
1  
Right! The cast should still work though. –  karmakaze May 31 '11 at 5:05
    
What is it you're expecting the cast to do / Where are you planning on putting it? Casting the argument to printf, isn't going to change the fact that printf will interpret it as a number... –  forsvarir May 31 '11 at 9:25
    
char *str = "'.'"; str[1] = 'a' + x; avoids the cast altogether but still depends on ASCII (sequential alphabet codepoonts). –  karmakaze May 31 '11 at 11:44
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