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I have the following method:

public IEnumerable<Foo> GetFoo(int x, string y) 
{
    return from r in new GetFoo(x, y)
           select new Foo 
           {
               x = r.Get<int>("x"),
               y = r.Get<string>("y"),
               z = r.Get<DateTime?>("z"),
           };
 }

GetFoo is a class that contains a stored procedure and implements IEnumerable<DbDataReader>. So, r is a DbDataReader. I want it to execute the query where the query syntax is declared and return a List<Foo>.
If this is not done, it is my understanding that the caller could simply not iterate the whole list and then the database connection will not be closed. I know I can just put it in parenthesis and call ToList() but I want to avoid this if possible. We have 200+ stored procedures, and it is too easy for a developer to miss adding the ToList().

Is there something I can implement to make what I want happen?

Update

This is not linq to sql, I have created a custom class, GetFoo that implements IEnumerable<DbDataReader>. The IEnumerator<DbDataReader> that is returned looks like this:

private class Enumerator : IEnumerator<DbDataReader> {
    DbDataReader _;
    public Enumerator(DbDataReader r) { _ = r; }
    public DbDataReader Current { get { return _; } }

    public void Dispose() { _.Dispose(); }

    object System.Collections.IEnumerator.Current { get { return _; } }
    public bool MoveNext() { return _.Read(); }
    public void Reset() { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
}

Update 2

I can't really enforce calling ToList() and/or requiring List<Foo> to be the return type of this method, and others like these. Developer review should catch not converting it to a list. Unfortunately if its missed there and in QA testing the application will run just fine. I'm simply trying to prevent a situation where the database connection could be left open.

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I imagine someone will clear up the db connection concerns. –  JeremyWeir May 31 '11 at 5:21
    
GetFoo is supposed to take care of it. The IEnumerator&lt;DbDataReader&gt; returned from GetEnumerator calls Dispose() on the DbDataReader inside of its Dispose() method. –  Charles Lambert May 31 '11 at 5:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Linq is based on deferred loading. It is when you call ToList that it executes the command. Otherwise it does not execute it. So the answer to your questions is no. However, I am not sure, maybe code contracts can help where you mark methods, or call the above code in functions which returns a List. In that case developers will be bound to return a List. Otherwise the code will not compile.

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1  
Seriously, how can this wall of text be marked as answer? Could you please use a bit of punctuation? –  Andrea Pigazzini May 31 '11 at 9:58
    
@Mercury thanks for advice!!! –  Deepesh May 31 '11 at 10:26

Some where you will need to change the return type to make it happen. Either you can change all such methods return type to be List<T> so that developers have to call ToList other wise the compiler will throw error Or your method which return IEnumerable<DbDataReader> should return a List<DbDataReader> where the DbDataReader is a custom implemented in memory data reader which was generated by reading data from the actual reader, this way you don't need to be worried about reader being left open.

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return a List<Foo>

Obviously, this is not what you are doing. You are returning IEnumerable<Foo>. If you return List<Foo>, there is nothing your developers can do than to call ToList.

If you really don't want to do this, I would recomend creating some kind of QueryObject, that will contain logic you have in your method there. And then call it through some kind of helper class, that will internaly call ToList on it. This would also comply with DRY principle.

Also you seem to only implement some kind of parsing of returned data set. So you only need to implement this parsing:

public abstract class BaseStoredProcedureQuery<TReturn>
{
    protected abstract TReturn ParseRecord(DbDataReader r);

    protected IEnumerable<TReturn> ParseQuery(IEnumerable<DbDataReader> readers)
    {
        return readers.Select<DbDataReader,TReturn>(ParseRecord).ToList();
    }
}

public class Query1 : BaseStoredProcedureQuery<Foo>
{
    protected override Foo ParseRecord(DbDataReader r)
    {
        return new Foo
                   {
                       x = r.Get<int>("x"),
                       y = r.Get<string>("y"),
                       z = r.Get<DateTime?>("z"),
                   };
    }

    public IEnumerable<Foo> GetFoo(int x, string y)
    {
        return ParseQuery(GetFoo(x, y));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's only one DbDataReader. Look at my IEnumerator<DbDataReader> implementation. –  Charles Lambert May 31 '11 at 6:12
    
Now that I look at it. You should implement some proper encapsulation. Your code looks weird at first sight. –  Euphoric May 31 '11 at 6:21
    
I know it looks weird, but the whole thing is powerful and terse. So long as they call ToList() we should be fine. It's not too much trouble to expect them to call it, but I like to protect programmers from themselves whenever possible. –  Charles Lambert May 31 '11 at 8:32

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