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i was hoping to use grep to check and see if permissions have been set correctly on a file...

I am aware that the below situation is probably not ideal & not as concise as it could be but i am after individual properties such as the owners name and the permissions...

I was going to use something like this:

cd ~/Desktop

if [ `ls -a | grep My File.txt | wc -l` -eq 1 ];
then
echo "My File.txt Exists"

    MYPERMISSIONS=`ls -l My File.txt`

    if [ `$MYPERMISSIONS | grep $"\-rwxr\-xr\-x" | wc -l` -eq 1 ];
        then
        echo "Permissions are correct for My File.txt"
    fi

    if [ `$MYPERMISSIONS | grep $"\-rwxr\-xr\-x" | wc -l` -eq 0 ];
        then
        echo "Permissions are NOT correct for My File.txt"
    fi

    if [ `$MYPERMISSIONS | grep root | wc -l` -eq 1 ];
    then
        echo "Owner is correct for My File.txt"
    fi

    if [ `$MYPERMISSIONS | grep root | wc -l` -eq 0 ];
    then
        echo "Owner is NOT correct for My File.txt"
    fi
fi

if [ `ls -a | grep My File.txt | wc -l` -eq 0 ];
then
echo "My File.txt does NOT Exist"
fi

it looks like grep does not want to search the "-" character...

any way of bypassing this?

Thanks!

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2  
How did you infer that grep is disregarding '-' character? –  vinothkr May 31 '11 at 5:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem is not the hyphen but several other syntax errors: you need to echo your data to get it into grep; you don't need to escape hyphens with backslashes; and you need to anchor your regular expression with a carat ^ (which will also avoid the hyphens-as-arguments problem mentioned by someone else).

Here's a start:

if [ `echo "$MYPERMISSIONS" | grep "^-rwxr-xr-x" | wc -l` -eq 1 ]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answers! –  Mattus May 31 '11 at 5:39
    
Instead of | wc -l you can use grep -c. –  l0b0 Jun 1 '11 at 13:04
    
Yeah, if you want to reduce it, you can go further than that. You can get rid of the brackets and backtics and just use the exit status from grep, since his data is just one line. But I thought I'd start with fixing the syntax problems. –  Rob Davis Jun 1 '11 at 15:31

The problem is that '-' is used to indicate flags. You can get around this by using the grep -e to force the next argument to be interpreted as a pattern rather than flags.

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I don't think that's this problem, but that can be a problem. –  user166390 May 31 '11 at 5:21
    
grep "^-"... works much better than grep "\-"... –  karmakaze May 31 '11 at 12:08

Try modifying your grep commands with:

if [ ls -a | grep 'My File\.txt' | wc -l -eq 0 ]; then echo "My File.txt does NOT Exist" fi
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I wonder if your problem is the space in your file name? The following, for instance, should work --

ls -l | grep "drwxr-xr-x" 
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There are a number of things wrong with the script, and only the most obvious things have been pointed out so far (you need to echo $MYPERMISSIONS to pipe it to grep, you don't need the excess escapes and such in the permissions string, and you need quote or escape spaces in the filename). There are also some subtler issues, mostly due to the dangers of parsing ls's output. Suppose, for example, there were a file named "Not My File.txt" in your Desktop directory -- the initial ls | grep | wc will match that, and print "My File.txt Exists" even though it doesn't (things are even weirder if both that and "My File.txt" exist). Second, suppose the file exists and is owned by "notroot" -- the script will think it is owned by root, because the ls listing contains "root". Third, suppose its group is "-rwxr-xr-x" (a perfectly legal group name, at least on some systems)...

Instead, to test whether a file exists, use the test command's -e primitive. To check ownership and permissions, stat gives you much better-behaved output.

Finally, rather than using redundant if commands (if file exists... followed by if file doesn't exist...), use the else clause on a single if command. After correcting all of this (and a little minor cleanup like putting the filename in a variable), here's how I'd rewrite the script:

cd ~/Desktop
filename="My File.txt"

if [ -e "$filename" ];
then
    echo "My File.txt Exists"

    if [ "$(stat -f "%Sp" "$filename")" = "-rwxr-xr-x" ]; then
        echo "Permissions are correct for My File.txt"
    else
        echo "Permissions are NOT correct for My File.txt"
    fi

    if [ "$(stat -f "%Su" "$filename")" = "root" ]; then
        echo "Owner is correct for My File.txt"
    else
        echo "Owner is NOT correct for My File.txt"
    fi

else
    echo "My File.txt does NOT Exist"
fi
share|improve this answer
    
+1, much improved solution. Don't parse ls output! –  l0b0 Jun 1 '11 at 13:06

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