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I am playing with the new Async CTP bits, and I can't get it work with either server-side or just command-line program (and all the examples are either WPF or Silverlight). For example, some trivial code like:

class Program {
    static void Main() {
        Program p = new Program();
        var s = p.Ten2SevenAsync();
        Console.WriteLine(s);
    }

    private async Task<int> Ten2SevenAsync() {
        await TaskEx.Delay(10000);
        return 7;
    }
}

returns immediately and prints System.Threading.Tasks.Task1[System.Int32]` instead of waiting for 10 secs and return 7 (as I would expect). Must be something obvious that I am missing.

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The whole point of the await-based code is that it is indeed "execute the next stuff when this is finished" (a callback), and not "block the current thread until this has finished".

As such, from Ten2SevenAsync you get back a task, but that task is not yet complete. Writing the task to the console does not mean it waits for it to complete. If you want to block on the task's completion:

static void Main() {
    Program p = new Program();
    var s = p.Ten2SevenAsync();
    Console.WriteLine(s.Result);
}

or more explicitly:

static void Main() {
    Program p = new Program();
    var s = p.Ten2SevenAsync();
    s.Wait();
    Console.WriteLine(s.Result);
}
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1  
@Felix - yes thanks, I am very familiar. And it works by exiting the actual method. If you exit Main (with only worker threads/tasks), you lose your process. It is not intended to act like synchronous code at all - it is just meant to be as convenient to write as synchronous code. –  Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 6:15
    
@Felix - you only get an int if you await s. But if you await s you have exited Main() - boom; no more process. Emphasis: await s means "run this as a callback", not "block until this is complete". However, your code sample (question) does not show Main as an async method - so any async usage must be explicit. To be honest, it is a bad idea to make Main an async method anyway. –  Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 6:17
    
sorry; I misunderstood what you said... I removed my stupid comment, and marked this as an answer :) –  Felix May 31 '11 at 6:17
1  
Haha, the curse of the ambiguous keyword strikes again :) –  Benjol May 31 '11 at 8:56
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I believe you just need to change the 4th line of your example to:

var s = await p.Ten2SevenAsync();
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Worse! I added await and async to Main, and now it doesn't print anything at all. Feels like "await" immediately returns to the caller: with Task<int> from Ten2Seven, and with nothing (void) to OS. –  Felix May 31 '11 at 5:48
4  
Why is this getting upvoted? –  tofutim May 31 '11 at 5:51
4  
If you make Main an async method, it will exit Main very early. And since the task happens on a worker, you will lose your entire process. –  Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 6:00
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s is a reference to an asynchronous task. I haven't played with this myself yet so I'm not sure of the syntax, but there will be members of s that will allow you to check whether or not the task has completed, and then retrieve the result.

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You are correct; .IsCompleted and .Result (note .Result also includes an implicit .Wait()) –  Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 6:20
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