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What is faster, one transaction with many queries or for every query a separate transaction?

One transaction with many queries:

 db.transaction(function (tx){
      tx.executeSql('INSERT INTO TEST VALUES ("Halo1" ,"Halo2")', [], win, fail);        
      tx.executeSql('INSERT INTO TEST VALUES ("Halo3" ,"Halo4")', [], win, fail);
      tx.executeSql('INSERT INTO TEST VALUES ("Halo5" ,"Halo6")', [], win, fail);
      .
      .
      .
      .
   });

One transaction per query:

    db.transaction(function(tx){
        tx.executeSql('INSERT INTO TEST VALUES ("Halo1" ,"Halo2")', [], win, fail);

    });

    db.transaction(function(tx){
        tx.executeSql('INSERT INTO TEST VALUES ("Halo3" ,"Halo4")', [], win, fail);

    });
    and so on.....

I need this info, because i have to insert many records in one table.

share|improve this question
    
why not give it a try?! – Andreas Niedermair May 31 '11 at 6:38
1  
Note that speed is not really the point: a transaction is intended for operations that must either happen completely, or not at all ("atomicity"); whether this is faster than making each operation inside its own transaction is irrelevant. – Piskvor May 31 '11 at 6:43
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's a trade-off. It's almost certainly going to be faster doing one transaction with lots of statements since you're avoiding the overhead of committing those transactions until the end, but measure, don't guess!

On the other hand, you don't want to put too much into a single transaction since the DBMS has to maintain control information about the transaction (rollback or rollforward logs and so on).

I would usually opt for a halfway position. Do your inserts in a function which automagicaly commits every N inserts. Something like the pseudo-code:

counter = 50
start new transaction                  # always start a transaction
for each insert_cmd in insert_list:
    call do_it (insert_cmd)
commit current transaction             # and always end it

def do_it (insert_cmd):
    if counter < 1:
        commit current transaction
        start new transaction
        counter = 50
    execute insert_cmd
    counter = counter - 1

Just make sure you're not circumventing the whole reason transactions were created. They are the A in your ACID properties (atomicity). If the inserts are required to be done as a single transaction to maintain the data properly, then do them that way.

share|improve this answer
    
yes it would be a tradeoff between accuracy and speed – ianace May 31 '11 at 6:44
    
Thx for this informativ answer. – John Bow May 31 '11 at 7:22

One transaction with many inserts will always be faster - much faster! That said, if something fails, you would lose all previous inserts...

share|improve this answer
    
That is quite the point of transactions: e.g. to transfer $100 from one account to another, you do some preliminary queries (e.g. sanity checks and logging thereof), and then you try to remove $100 from the source account. Oops, insuficient funds, ABORT. – Piskvor May 31 '11 at 6:46

Fastest way to determine speed of partial sourcecode is to make a loop of about 5.000 iterations around the specific part (maybe more, depends on how fast the code is executed) and measure the time difference between a timestamp before the loop started and a timestamp thereafter. Works in every language that supports any time measuring. Hope this will help.

share|improve this answer

It will be faster to use a single transaction, but that doesn't mean that it uses less resources.

At the first insert the transaction will lock up part of the table or the whole table. Any other query trying to use the table will be queued up until the transaction ends. You should not only consider the time that the inserts will take, but also the time that is wasted when other queries can't run.

If there are few concurrent connections that is usually not a big problem. If you have much load on the database, you should consider using smaller transactions. By locking up the table for a shorter time, you will avoid queueing up queries.

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