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Are Magic Methods Best practice in PHP?

These are simple examples, but imagine you have more properties than two in your class.

What would be best practice?

a) Using __get and __set

class MyClass {
    private $firstField;
    private $secondField;

    public function __get($property) {
            if (property_exists($this, $property)) {
                return $this->$property;
            }
    }

    public function __set($property, $value) {
        if (property_exists($this, $property)) {
            $this->$property = $value;
        }
    }
}

$myClass = new MyClass();

$myClass->firstField = "This is a foo line";
$myClass->secondField = "This is a bar line";

echo $myClass->firstField;
echo $myClass->secondField;

/* Output:
    This is a foo line
    This is a bar line
 */

b) Using traditional setters and getters

class MyClass {

    private $firstField;
    private $secondField;

    public function getFirstField() {
        return $this->firstField;
    }

    public function setFirstField($firstField) {
        $this->firstField = $firstField;
    }

    public function getSecondField() {
        return $this->secondField;
    }

    public function setSecondField($secondField) {
        $this->secondField = $secondField;
    }

}

$myClass = new MyClass();

$myClass->setFirstField("This is a foo line");
$myClass->setSecondField("This is a bar line");

echo $myClass->getFirstField();
echo $myClass->getSecondField();

/* Output:
    This is a foo line
    This is a bar line
 */

In this article: http://blog.webspecies.co.uk/2011-05-23/the-new-era-of-php-frameworks.html

The author claims that using magic methods is not a good idea:

First of all, back then it was very popular to use PHP’s magic functions (__get, __call etc.). There is nothing wrong with them from a first look, but they are actually really dangerous. They make APIs unclear, auto-completion impossible and most importantly they are slow. The use case for them was to hack PHP to do things which it didn’t want to. And it worked. But made bad things happen.

But I would like to hear more opinions about this.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gordon, KingCrunch, edorian, John Saunders, Graviton Jun 4 '11 at 2:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
(tip) GetterEradicator –  Gordon May 31 '11 at 8:02
    
(tip) How to remove getters and setters –  Gordon Jun 1 '11 at 11:00
2  
I agree that __get is more slow to a custom get function (doing the same things), this is 0.0124455 the time for __get() and this 0.0024445 is for custom get() after 10000 loops. –  Melsi Nov 23 '12 at 22:32

9 Answers 9

up vote 57 down vote accepted

I have been exactly in your case in the past. And I went for magic methods.

This was a mistake, the last part of your question says it all :

  • this is slower (than getters/setters)
  • there is no auto-completion (and this is a major problem actually), and type management by the IDE for refactoring and code-browsing (under Zend Studio/PhpStorm this can be handled with the @property phpdoc annotation but that requires to maintain them: quite a pain)
  • the documentation (phpdoc) doesn't match how your code is supposed to be used, and looking at your class doesn't bring much answers as well. This is confusing.
  • added after edit: having getters for properties is more consistent with "real" methods where getXXX() is not only returning a private property but doing real logic. You have the same naming. For example you have $user->getName() (returns private property) and $user->getToken($key) (computed). The day your getter gets more than a getter and needs to do some logic, everything is still consistent.

Finally, and this is the biggest problem IMO : this is magic. And magic is very very bad, because you have to know how the magic works to use it properly. That's a problem I've met in a team: everybody has to understand the magic, not just you.

Getters and setters are a pain to write (I hate them) but they are worth it.

share|improve this answer
3  
I think that magic methods are there for a reason... –  Adam Arold May 31 '11 at 13:59
4  
While I agree with your general argument that __get and __set should not be abused for lazy accessors, it is not true that you cannot get autocompletion for them. See stackoverflow.com/questions/3814733/… on how to do that. –  Gordon May 31 '11 at 15:00
1  
@stereofrog : Yes, this is exactly that :p. But another thing I forgot to mention is that: having getters for properties is more coherent with "real" methods where getXXX is not only returning a private property but doing real logic. You have the same naming. For example you have $user->getName() (returns property) and $user->getToken() (computed). –  Matthieu Napoli Jun 1 '11 at 10:52
3  
well, having "$user->name" (plain) and "$user->token" (computed via __get) is even more consistent, isn't it. –  user187291 Jun 1 '11 at 10:57
1  
The only thing I can really agree with here is they are probably slower than getters/setters, but in many cases that does not really matter; what's a millisecond if not used frequently? You can get autocomplete (at least in PhpStorm) by setting PHPDoc's @property which also provides documentation and the last point about consistency is merely opinion and opinions vary (see user187291's comment.) There is a benefit to using __get() that has not been mentioned AFAICT and that's properties can be embedded in HEREDOCs but method calls cannot. –  MikeSchinkel Feb 24 '13 at 1:07

I use __get (and public properties) as much as possible, because they make code much more readable. Compare:

this code unequivocally says what i'm doing:

echo $user->name;

this code makes me feel stupid, which i don't enjoy:

function getName() { return $this->_name; }
....

echo $user->getName();

The difference between the two is particularly obvious when you access multiple properties at once.

echo "
    Dear $user->firstName $user->lastName!
    Your purchase:
        $product->name  $product->count x $product->price
"

and

echo "
    Dear " . $user->getFirstName() . " " . $user->getLastName() . "
    Your purchase: 
        " . $product->getName() . " " . $product->getCount() . "  x " . $product->getPrice() . " ";

Whether "$a->b" should really do something or just return a value is the responsibility of the callee. For the caller, "$user->name" and "$user->accountBalance" should look the same, although the latter may involve complicated calculations. In my data classes i use the following small method:

 function __get($p) { 
      $m = "get_$p";
      if(method_exists($this, $m)) return $this->$m();
      user_error("undefined property $p");
 }

when someone calls "$obj->xxx" and the class has "get_xxx" defined, this method will be implicitly called. So you can define a getter if you need it, while keeping your interface uniform and transparent. As an additional bonus this provides an elegant way to memoize calculations:

  function get_accountBalance() {
      $result = <...complex stuff...>
      // since we cache the result in a public property, the getter will be called only once
      $this->accountBalance = $result;
  }

  ....


   echo $user->accountBalance; // calculate the value
   ....
   echo $user->accountBalance; // use the cached value

Bottom line: php is a dynamic scripting language, use it that way, don't pretend you're doing Java or C#.

share|improve this answer
1  
why was this down voted? –  mikeycgto Jun 13 '11 at 16:17
5  
@Matthieu: As noted in the answer, $foo->bar would simply call $this->get_bar(), which is a getter and can be changed to do whatever you need it to. –  drrcknlsn Feb 13 '13 at 0:09
3  
do you know -> Dear {$user->getFirstName()} ?? –  Mauro Jun 11 '13 at 15:37
4  
Your final line is my philosophy: Let PHP be PHP, let SQL be SQL, let Javascript be Javascript, let HTML be HTML, let Java, C#, or your chosen language be what it is and operate how it's designed to operate. Inherent in that is that it's mainly effective when your team knows how to do that, how to use a language to its greatest potential as opposed to shoe-horning it into another language's style, but that's how you're going to get the best work anyway, it won't be by trying to make PHP be Java, etc. –  Jason Aug 22 '13 at 13:32
2  
... In addition, I feel that a lot of "best practice" in PHP is being driven by Java programmers that started using PHP because they needed or wanted a better "web page" language, and found the (at the time) truly abysmal state of good programming hygiene in the PHP world and enforced their worldview just to get some structure, and some structure being better than none, it was taken that this is actually the best way to do things in PHP. It may be that that's just where the language is headed, but I don't think it represents ultimate truth, at least not at the moment. –  Jason Aug 22 '13 at 13:38

You only need to use magic if the object is indeed "magical". If you have a classic object with fixed properties then use setters and getters, they work fine.

If your object have dynamic properties for example it is part of a database abstraction layer, and its parameters are set at runtime then you indeed need the magic methods for convenience.

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2  
Actually, your answer explains all (+1)! –  trejder Apr 25 at 10:31
    
I agree. Best answer so far. Don't know why it doesn't have more up votes. Do it like this: $user->getFirstName() and use magic only when really needed. –  tastro Jul 3 at 17:20

I vote for a third solution. I use this in my projects and Symfony uses something like this too:

public function __call($val, $x) {
    if(substr($val, 0, 3) == 'get') {
        $varname = strtolower(substr($val, 3));
    }
    else {
        throw new Exception('Bad method.', 500);
    }
    if(property_exists('Yourclass', $varname)) {
        return $this->$varname;
    } else {
        throw new Exception('Property does not exist: '.$varname, 500);
    }
}

This way you have automated getters (you can write setters too), and you only have to write new methods if there is a special case for a member variable.

share|improve this answer
1  
I recommend against it too, I've detailed why in my answer. –  Matthieu Napoli May 31 '11 at 8:31

I do a mix of edem's answer and your second code. This way, I have the benefits of common getter/setters (code completion in your IDE), ease of coding if I want, exceptions due to inexistent properties (great for discovering typos: $foo->naem instead of $foo->name), read only properties and compound properties.

class Foo
{
    private $_bar;
    private $_baz;

    public function getBar()
    {
        return $this->_bar;
    }

    public function setBar($value)
    {
        $this->_bar = $value;
    }

    public function getBaz()
    {
        return $this->_baz;
    }

    public function getBarBaz()
    {
        return $this->_bar . ' ' . $this->_baz;
    }

    public function __get($var)
    {
        $func = 'get'.$var;
        if (method_exists($this, $func))
        {
            return $this->$func();
        } else {
            throw new InexistentPropertyException("Inexistent property: $var");
        }
    }

    public function __set($var, $value)
    {
        $func = 'set'.$var;
        if (method_exists($this, $func))
        {
            $this->$func($value);
        } else {
            if (method_exists($this, 'get'.$var))
            {
                throw new ReadOnlyException("property $var is read-only");
            } else {
                throw new InexistentPropertyException("Inexistent property: $var");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This is confusing : always avoid providing 2 ways of doing the same thing. –  Matthieu Napoli May 31 '11 at 8:26
    
Well, I always code the same way, using those virtual properties. I usually put the getters and setters private, but for the sake of the example I left them public here because someone complained about IDE autocompletion. –  Carlos Campderrós May 31 '11 at 8:28
    
I think this makes a lot of sense. You can let the magic do the work most of the time, and only implement the custom get/set functions for the magic to call as needed. –  colonelclick Jun 17 '13 at 20:14

You should use stdClass if you want magic members, if you write a class - define what it contains.

share|improve this answer
    
Using stdClass objects doesn't solve the OP's problem; the entire point of this question is that he wants getters and setters that do custom logic, not a behaviorless data object. –  Mark Amery Jan 21 at 14:19
    
On the bottom of the OP's question he clearly notes that he'd like to hear more opinion's on the subject. So by giving my opinion, I actually do answer his question. He does not ask for actual coding sample or anything.. –  Wesley van Opdorp Jan 22 at 12:14
    
I'm not criticising the lack of code samples or the fact that your proposed approach isn't one of the two the question originally suggested - I'm criticising the fact that it simply does not work, full stop, for the purpose that the OP was asking about (which was having properties with custom getting and setting logic). –  Mark Amery Jan 22 at 13:37

Secound code example is much more proper way to do this becouse u are taking full control of data witch are given to class. There are cases in which the __set and __get are usefull but not in this case.

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The best practice would be to use traditionnal getters and setters, because of introspection or reflection. There is a way in PHP (exactly like in Java) to obtain the name of a method or of all methods. Such a thing would return "__get" in the first case and "getFirstField", "getSecondField" in the second (plus setters).

More on that: http://php.net/manual/en/book.reflection.php

share|improve this answer
    
Also, magic methods aren't going to work with interfaces and abstract classes/methods. And what about visibility? It's a leak to have a private or protected property modifiable by a magic __set method. Add these to your examples and I agree that there are many good arguments against using magic methods for getter/setters -- and no real arguments in their favor. For quick one-offs, maybe use them for something, but they're not a best practice for reusable code/libraries/APIs. –  joelhardi May 31 '11 at 8:47

I am now returning to setters and getters but I am also putting the getters and setters in the magic methos __get and __set. This way I have a default behavior when I do this

$class->var;

This will just call the getter I have set in the __get. Normally I will just use the getter directly but there are still some instances where this is just simpler.

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