Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've written a Miller-Rabin primality test based on the following pseudo code:

Input: n > 2, an odd integer to be tested for primality;
       k, a parameter that determines the accuracy of the test
Output: composite if n is composite, otherwise probably prime
write n − 1 as 2s·d with d odd by factoring powers of 2 from n − 1
LOOP: repeat k times:
   pick a randomly in the range [2, n − 1]
   x ← ad mod n
   if x = 1 or x = n − 1 then do next LOOP
   for r = 1 .. s − 1
      x ← x2 mod n
      if x = 1 then return composite
      if x = n − 1 then do next LOOP
   return composite
return probably prime

The code I have rarely gets past 31 (if I put it in a loop to test numbers from 2 to 100). There must be something wrong but I can't see what it is.

bool isProbablePrime(ulong n, int k) {
    if (n < 2 || n % 2 == 0) 
        return n == 2;

    ulong d = n - 1;
    ulong s = 0;
    while (d % 2 == 0) {
        d /= 2;
        s++;
    }
    assert(2 ^^ s * d == n - 1); 
    outer:
    foreach (_; 0 .. k) {
        ulong a = uniform(2, n);
        ulong x = (a ^^ d) % n;
        if (x == 1 || x == n - 1)
            continue;
        foreach (__; 1 .. s) {
            x = (x ^^ 2) % n;
            if (x == 1) return false;
            if (x == n - 1) continue outer;
        }
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

I've also tried the variant

    ...

    foreach (__; 1 .. s) {
        x = (x ^^ 2) % n;
        if (x == 1) return false;
        if (x == n - 1) continue outer;
    }
    if ( x !=  n - 1) return false;  // this is different

    ...

I have a different version of the test that works correctly but it uses modpow. I'd like to have a version that stays closer to the pseudo code that's part of the rossetta.org task description.

Edit: Re: overflow problem. I suspected something like that. I'm still puzzled why the Ruby version doesn't have that problem. It probably handles it differently under the hood. If I use BigInt, the code does work, but becomes a lot slower than when I use modpow. So I guess I can't get away from that. It's a pity Phobos doesn't have a modpow built-in, or I must have overlooked it.

ulong x = ((BigInt(a) ^^ d) % BigInt(n)).toLong();
share|improve this question
1  
It looks like Ruby doesn't have that problem because it automatically uses Bignum on impending overflow: ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Bignum.html –  BCS May 31 '11 at 21:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In this statement

ulong x = (a ^^ d) % n;

the quantity (a ^^ d) is probably overflowing before the mod operation can take place. The modpow version wouldn't suffer from this problem, since that algorithm avoids the need for arbitrarily large intermediate values.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.