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I have a set of text fields qty with dynamic names: like qty541 ; qty542 ; qty957 formed by the word: "qty" and the product id

How can I verify if all my qty fields are empty or not with Javascript ?

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
Can you use something like jQuery? –  Jared Farrish May 31 '11 at 8:22
    
Yes, but I want also to use window.onbeforeunload, to prevent that the user quit the page and lose data when He have typed quantity in the qty fields... –  Bizboss May 31 '11 at 8:27
    
It is easier with a unic Id for all the qty fields ? I can give a unic id "qty"... –  Bizboss May 31 '11 at 8:52
    
... or you could use a class="qty" attribute. –  Jared Farrish May 31 '11 at 9:29
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using:

<p>
 <input type="text" name="qty3232" value="43"/><br/>
 <input type="text" name="qty5532" value="as"/><br/>
 <input type="text" name="qty5521" value=""/><br/>
 <input type="text" name="qty3526" value="34"/>
</p>
<br/>
<h3>Log</h3>
<pre id="log"></pre>

Javascript (no jQuery):

var inputs = document.getElementsByTagName('input');
var log = document.getElementById('log');

for (var i = 0; i < inputs.length; i++) {
    if (inputs[i].type == 'text' && inputs[i].name.substring(0,3) == 'qty') {
        if (inputs[i].value == '') {
            log.innerHTML += inputs[i].name + " value empty.\n";
        } else {
            log.innerHTML += inputs[i].name + " value not empty.\n";
        }
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/jxmMW/

This is much easier using a selector in jQuery, though.

var log = $('#log');

$('input[name^="qty"]').each(function(){
    if (this.value == '') {
        log[0].innerHTML += this.name + " value empty.\n";
    } else {
        log[0].innerHTML += this.name + " value not empty.\n";
    }
});

http://jsfiddle.net/jxmMW/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, what does log.innerHTML += inputs[i].name + " value empty.\n"; do ? :) –  Bizboss May 31 '11 at 8:34
    
@Bizboss: It converts the DOM content of the log element to a string, then appends further content to that string, then tears down the DOM content of the log element and builds up new content with the updated string. I'd strongly recommend not using += with innerHTML, but it does work. –  T.J. Crowder May 31 '11 at 8:36
    
@Bizboss - As you didn't include any markup/code to review, I use that to demonstrate the test. It simply appends the output on the right of the equal to within the PRE with id="log". Click on the link and you'll see what I'm talking about. –  Jared Farrish May 31 '11 at 8:38
    
@T.J. Crowder - I think for the purposes of a short demo, it works just fine. :) –  Jared Farrish May 31 '11 at 8:39
    
Thanks:) I'm trying to make it with : <script type="text/javascript"> window.onbeforeunload = function() { return "Are you sure to close the page?"; }; </script> in a onsubmit event in my form... –  Bizboss May 31 '11 at 8:50
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The easiest way is to use a javascript framework like JQuery, Protoype, etc. With this framework you can create a search pattern in reg expr manner. If you unable to use one, it does need more work:

One way:

var formObj = document.forms[0]; //as an example
var fields = formObj.getElementsByTagName("input");
for (i=0; i < fields.length, i++)
{
   if (fiedls[i].name.indexOf("qty") > 1)
   {
     //do something
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 The first asnwer which is any good. But rather fiedls[i].name.indexOf("qty") == 0 as this has to be the first 3 characters. –  vbence May 31 '11 at 8:34
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You can loop through the elements of the form:

var form = document.getElementById('theForm');
var index;
var field;
for (index = 0; index < form.elements.length; ++index) {
    field = form.elements[index];
    if (field.name.substring(0, 3) === "qty") {
        // Check field.value here
    }
}

Live example

The above assumes the form has an id, but however you get access to the form element, the rest follows.


Off-topic: A lot of this stuff is made much simpler by the utility functions available in various JavaScript libraries like jQuery, Prototype, YUI, Closure, or any of several others. They also smooth over browser differences (or outright browser bugs), allowing you to focus on the job in hand rather than worrying about browser inconsistencies.

share|improve this answer
    
J. superb one! +1 –  sra May 31 '11 at 8:29
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Plain JS:

For example use class="quantity" on all fields and use getElementsByClassName - which almost takes us into jQuery mode

window.onbeforeunload=function() {
  var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("quantity"); // needs help in some browsers
  for (var i=0,n=elems.length;i<n;i++) {
    if (elems[i].value!="") {
      return "You have filled in a quantity");
    }
  }
}

window.onload=function() {
  document.forms[0].onsubmit=validate;
}

function validate() {
  var elems = document.getElementsByClassName("quantity"); 
  for (var i=0,n=elems.length;i<n;i++) {
    if (elems[i].value=="") {
        alert("Please fill in a quantity");
        elems[i].focus();
        return false;
      }
    }
  }

standard method:

function validate() {
  var elem;
  for (var i=0,n=this.elements.length;i<n;i++) {
    elem = this.elements[i];
    if (elem.name && elem.name.indexOf("qty")===0) {
      if (elem.value=="") {
        alert("Please fill in a quantity");
        elem.focus();
        return false;
      }
    }
  }
  return true; // allow submit
}
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful with recommendation of .getElementsByClassName(). This function is only available in new Javascrip of HTML5. –  reporter May 31 '11 at 8:35
    
Hence the link to the needed extensions for un-supported browsers. –  mplungjan May 31 '11 at 8:39
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