Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a dictionary set up like this

{
     "key1" : [1,2,4],
     "key2" : [2,4],
     "key3" : [1,2,4],
     "key4" : [2,4],
     ....
}

What I want is something like this.

[
  [ 
     ["key1", "key3"],
     [1,2,4],
  ],
  [ 
     ["key2", "key4"],
     [2,4],
  ],
  .....
]

A list of keys and values based on unique value pairs. How can I do this in a pythonic way?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

You can invert the dictionnary like this :

orig = {
     "key1" : [1,2,4],
     "key2" : [2,4],
     "key3" : [1,2,4],
     "key4" : [2,4],
}

new_dict = {}

for k, v in orig.iteritems():
    new_dict.setdefault(tuple(v), []).append(k)    #need to "freeze" the mutable type into an immutable to allow it to become a dictionnary key (hashable object)

# Here we have new_dict like this :
#new_dict = {
#    (2, 4): ['key2', 'key4'],
#    (1, 2, 4): ['key3', 'key1']
#}

# like sverre suggested :
final_output = [[k,v] for k,v in new_dict.iteritems()]
share|improve this answer
    
"Invert", actually. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 31 '11 at 8:40
1  
Note that to get from here to the structure OP specified is simply [[k,v] for k,v in new_dict.iteritems()] –  sverre May 31 '11 at 8:44
    
@Ignacio, sverre : thanks, I edited my answer with your propoistions –  Cédric Julien May 31 '11 at 8:52
1  
@sverre Actually to get what the OP requested you need slightly different: [[k,list(v)] for v,k in new_dict.iteritems()] i.e. switch k and v around. Also iteritems() doesn't exist in Python 3, use items() if you want the code snippet to work in both (the OP didn't say which). –  Duncan May 31 '11 at 8:58

Here is a list comprehension to do the job cleanly:

[[[key for key in dictionary.keys() if dictionary[key] == value], value]
   for value in unique(list(dictionary.values()))]

Where unique can be a function that returns the unique elements of a list. There is no default for this, but there are many implementations (here are some).

share|improve this answer

Please find my sample code below if it is still actual for you:

orig = {
     "key1" : [1,2,4],
     "key2" : [2,4],
     "key3" : [1,2,4],
     "key4" : [2,4],
}

unique = map(list, set(map(tuple, orig.values())))
print map(lambda val: [val, filter(lambda key: orig[key] == val, orig)], unique)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.