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I figured out that it's possible to initialize the member variables with a constructor argument of the same name as show in the example below.

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>

class Blah {
    std::vector<int> vec;

public:
    Blah(std::vector<int> vec): vec(vec)
    {}

    void printVec() {

        for(unsigned int i=0; i<vec.size(); i++)
            printf("%i ", vec.at(i));

        printf("\n");
    }
};

int main() {

    std::vector<int> myVector(3);

    myVector.at(0) = 1;
    myVector.at(1) = 2;
    myVector.at(2) = 3;

    Blah blah(myVector);

    blah.printVec();

    return 0;
}

g++ 4.4 with the arguments -Wall -Wextra -pedantic gives no warning and works correctly. It also works with clang++. I wonder what the C++ standard says about it? Is it legal and guaranteed to always work?

share|improve this question
1  
@Heandel: int x = 5; { int x = x; // problem? }. Yes, so maybe this too. –  GManNickG May 31 '11 at 8:49
4  
@Heandel: You're joking, right? You know that because you have knowledge the questioner doesn't. He's asking for the clarification, hence the question. What a vacuous approach to answering questions. –  GManNickG May 31 '11 at 8:52
1  
@Heandel: ಠ​_​ಠ –  GManNickG May 31 '11 at 8:57
    
Good question. I've actually been using this "style" quite a lot. Never doubted that it is allowed. –  ltjax May 31 '11 at 9:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 25 down vote accepted

I wonder what the C++ standard says about it? Is it legal and guaranteed to always work?

Yes. That is perfectly legal. Fully Standard conformant.

Blah(std::vector<int> vec): vec(vec){}
                             ^   ^                           
                             |   |
                             |    this is the argument to the constructor
                             this is your member data

Since you asked for the reference in the Standard, here it is, with an example.

§12.6.2/7

Names in the expression-list of a mem-initializer are evaluated in the scope of the constructor for which the mem-initializer is specified.

[Example:
class X {
 int a;
 int b;
 int i;
 int j;
 public:
 const int& r;
  X(int i): r(a), b(i), i(i), j(this->i) {}
                      //^^^^ note this (added by Nawaz)
};

initializes X::r to refer to X::a, initializes X::b with the value of the constructor parameter i, initializes X::i with the value of the constructor parameter i, and initializes X::j with the value of X::i; this takes place each time an object of class X is created. ]

[Note: because the mem-initializer are evaluated in the scope of the constructor, the this pointer can be used in the expression-list of a mem-initializer to refer to the object being initialized. ]

As you can see, there're other interesting thing to note in the above example, and the commentary from the Standard itself.


BTW, as side note, why don't you accept the parameter as const reference:

 Blah(const std::vector<int> & vec): vec(vec) {}
      ^^^^const              ^reference

It avoids unneccessary copy of the original vector object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx for the quick answer, however in the standards document (n3290) I can't find initialization lists, which chapter? –  Nils May 31 '11 at 8:50
    
So if I accept it as a reference it's just copied once? From the function scope to the member variable. But if I don't accept the parameter as a reference it is copied again just in the scope of the constructor, right? Thx for pointing that out. –  Nils May 31 '11 at 8:56
    
@Nils: Yes. Copied from the original source to the final destination. Original source = the vector in the main(), and final destination = member data. –  Nawaz May 31 '11 at 8:59
2  
In C++0x it's better to accept it by-value, then move it to its destination: Blah(std::vector<int> vec) : vec(std::move(vec)){}. You can simulate this in C++03 like this: Blah(std::vector<int> vecSrc) { std::swap(vec, vecSrc); }. –  GManNickG May 31 '11 at 9:04
1  
@Tomalak: lol, I'm still surprised you find that unreadable. It's pretty straight-forward and, I thought, common-place. –  GManNickG May 31 '11 at 16:16

It is guaranteed always to work (I use it quite often). The compiler knows that the initializer list is of the form: member(value), and so it knows that the first vec in vec(vec) must be a member. Now on the argument to initialize the member, both members, arguments to the constructor and other symbols can be used, as in any expression that would be present inside the constructor. At this point it applies the regular lookup rules, and the argument vec hides the member vec.

Section 12.6.2 of the standard deals with initialization and it explains the process with paragraph 2 dealing with lookup for the member and paragraph 7 with the lookup of the argument.

Names in the expression-list of a mem-initializer are evaluated in the scope of the constructor for which the mem-initializer is specified. [Example:

class X {
   int a;
   int b;
   int i;
   int j;
public:
   const int& r;
   X(int i): r(a), b(i), i(i), j(this->i) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
thx for the ref to the standard –  Nils May 31 '11 at 8:57

overloaded Constructors can be instantiated to set member data. As with any Constructor, of any class, you can use a comma separated list to initializes the member variables of that class, and subsequently inherited classes as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not answer the question at all. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 9:16
    
You describe what a ctor-initializer is, but you don't even approach the actual question, which is about the scope of expressions within the ctor-initializer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 9:47

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