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We're in the middle of deploying a new software system to lot's of users in lot's of places (200+ users over 8 countries). In the past we've written a manual for the users, then update it every so often. This works ok, in that all the users ahve the same manual and it covers the main things but it has it's problems, like it doesn't get updated that often, we sometimes miss updates, and some users will have old copies.

We've been talking about using a wiki during the testing and deployment phases to build a knowledge base about the system. Ideally we'd then like some way to convert that into some form fo electronic document that we can then 'pretty-fie' and send out as the official manual, as well as letting users use and update the wiki.

Has anyone else done anything similar ? Any suggestions for wiki systems, workflows, document formats etc?

Thanks

Paul.

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I've since found these links for media wiki;mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:Collection mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:OpenDocument_Export –  PaulHurleyuk Mar 6 '09 at 16:23
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Most wikis support export via PDF e.g.:

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I gave a previous answer which may be useful for the "wiki to PDF" part -- look at using the open source PediaPress code or functionality. You can get ODFs from it too, although their PDFs are already quite pretty (but you might want to rebrand it and restyle it for your company I suppose).

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Madcap Flare is a help-and-manual authoring tool that uses HTML for the source of each topic. You could pretty easily do a mass import of the Wiki pages. Would then require some cleaning but after that you have a nice single-source system that can output CHM, web-browsable help, PDF, DOC/DOCX, etc.

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Have you used it to any large extent? If so, would you mind elaborating on the section on it in the answer at stackoverflow.com/questions/371654/… –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Mar 6 '09 at 12:50
    
Sure have, I added some comments to the answer linked. Incredible answer, by the way, a sterling example of what SO is all about. –  Aidan Ryan Mar 8 '09 at 15:58
    
Thanks for doing the edits Aidan; looks like the voice of experience. –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Mar 9 '09 at 6:38
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You can write something that generates LaTeX from the wiki and renders a manual to PDF. With packages like hyperref you can retain cross-references as hyperlinks.

Additionally, you can integrate content from multiple sources such as a data dictionary into the LaTeX document, which can be mixed and matched with the wiki content. You could also set the architecture up so it can support cross-referencing that goes either way.

Framemaker could also support this using generated MIF files, and you could also use Lout in a similar way or convert your wiki content to docbook, which would allow you to use any of the many rendering options available to that format.

As an aside, the following Stackoverflow postings discuss various systems for maintaining documentation.

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That looks good. From the media wiki page (one of the wiki's we're considering) there are a few extensions that look like they'll fit; mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:Collection mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:OpenDocument_Export –  PaulHurleyuk Mar 6 '09 at 11:57
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I followed Node's links and came across some mediawiki pages that I thought were noteworthy.

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How are you storing the help source at the moment? Is it MS Word files, MS help, LaTeX?

If you put your help source files under version control then you will get all the benefits of a wiki without having to migrate to a new system - people can make edits to the help files easily - those changes can be tracked, reverted etc. and you get the prettified manuals as before.

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There's nothing at the moment, we have a few older documents in Word, but will be starting from scratch with the new system, and I'm very drawn to the idea of developing the documentation over the life of the implementation rather than in one big task at the end. –  PaulHurleyuk Mar 6 '09 at 16:23
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