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I have this template function:

template <class P>
double Determinant(const P & a, const P & b, const P & c) {
    return  (b.x-a.x)*(c.y-a.y) - (c.x-a.x)*(b.y-a.y);
}

but I want to avoid forcing the return type to double all the time -- P::x and P::y could be ints too, and I need this function in both situations. Is there a way to specify the type of x and y, something like this?

//doesn't compile; can't deduce template argument for T
template <typename T, class P>
T Determinant(const P & a, const P & b, const P & c) {
    return  (b.x-a.x)*(c.y-a.y) - (c.x-a.x)*(b.y-a.y);
}

edit: My compiler is VC2005

edit2: sorry to forget to mention: Unfortunately I can't modify the implementation of the structs for P; one of the point types I deal with is MFC/ATL's CPoint, which are hard-coded as { long x; long y; }.

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Which compiler(s) are you using? –  Xeo May 31 '11 at 9:14
    
vc2005 - edited into the question now. –  martin_ljchan May 31 '11 at 9:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Compiler cannot deduce return-type of function template, from function argument. Type deduction is done with function arguments only.

In C++03, you can define typedef in your class as:

struct A //suppose A is going to be type argument to your function template
{
   int x, y;     //I'm assuming type of x and y is same!
   typedef int value_type; //type of x and y!
};

And then you've to re-write your function as:

template <class P>
typename P::value_type Determinant(const P & a, const P & b, const P & c) {
    return  (b.x-a.x)*(c.y-a.y) - (c.x-a.x)*(b.y-a.y);
}

Notice the return-type now, its a dependent type. Its :

typename P::value_type

The keyword typename is required here.


Alright, as you said you can't modify your structs, then you can use traits instead. Here is how this can be done:

template<typename T> struct PTraits;

//Suppose this is your type which you can't modify
struct A //A is going to be type argument to your function template
{
   long x, y; 
};

//specialization: defining traits for struct A
template<>
struct PTraits<A>
{
    typedef long value_type; //since type of A::x and A::y is long!
};

And your function template would look like this:

template <class P>
typename PTraits<P>::value_type Determinant(const P & a, const P & b, const P & c) {
    return  (b.x-a.x)*(c.y-a.y) - (c.x-a.x)*(b.y-a.y);
}

Notice the return-type; its slightly different now:

typename PTraits<P>::value_type

Again, value_type is a dependent name, so the keyword typename is required.

Note that you've to specialize PTraits<> for each type which you pass to the function template, as I did.

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1  
neat trick Nawaz; haven't thought of that before. Unfortunately I can't modify the implementation of the struct; one of the point types I deal with is MFC/ATL's CPoint, which are hard-coded as { long x; long y; }, with no useful typedefs of this sort. –  martin_ljchan May 31 '11 at 9:25
    
@martin_ljchan: See the second solution! –  Nawaz May 31 '11 at 9:33
1  
traits! : ) I gotta read up on that some time. –  martin_ljchan May 31 '11 at 9:51
1  
@martin_ljchan: You can start from here: Traits: a new and useful template technique by Nathan C. Myers. I think it was him who first described this technique. :-) –  Nawaz May 31 '11 at 10:06
    
interesting, thanks! –  martin_ljchan May 31 '11 at 11:25

I like to use a traits style approach to this:

template<typename T> struct DeterminantReturnInfo {};  
template<> struct DeterminantReturnInfo<MyType> { typedef MyOtherType ReturnType; }

template< typename T >
typename DeterminantReturnInfo<T>::ReturnType Determinant( const P & a, const P & B, const P & c)
{
  return  (b.x-a.x)*(c.y-a.y) - (c.x-a.x)*(b.y-a.y);
}

If you want it to default to double then you just add typedef double ReturnType; to the initial template.

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typedef ReturnType double;? Wrong syntax –  Nawaz May 31 '11 at 11:12
    
Indeed. Fixed. (Though its an obvious typo that you could have corrected with the edit button) –  Michael Anderson Jun 1 '11 at 0:26

If you're using Visual Studio 2010 or GCC 4.5+, you can use the trailing return type form:

template<class P>
auto fun(const P& a) -> decltype(a.x + a.y){
  return a.x + a.y;
}

Thanks to decltype we automatically get the right return type. Also, the computation is still only done once in the body, not in the trailing return.

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no c++0x in tags –  BЈовић May 31 '11 at 9:50

Check your return Type its of type member variable x/y . You might not returning so type T.

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