Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why doesn't the following doesn't handle the exception that was rethrown? I tried all the combinations but none of them would show the output in last catch so I'm confused!

Derived D;

try {
       throw D;
} catch ( const Derived &d) {
       throw;
} catch (const Base &b) {
      cout << "caught!" << endl;
}

Derived D;

try {
    throw D;
} catch ( const Derived d) {
    throw;
} catch (const Base b) {
    cout << "caught!" << endl;
}

Derived D;

try {
    throw D;
} catch ( const Derived d) {
    throw;
} catch (const Base &b) {
    cout << "caught!" << endl;
}

Derived D;

try {
    throw D;
} catch ( const Derived &d) {
    throw;
} catch (const Base b) {
    cout << "caught!" << endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
Well, you are not showing us the code that is expected to catch the rethrown exception. The next catch of the same try is not expected to catch it, only another try is. –  Jan Hudec May 31 '11 at 10:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The re-throw is not handled by the same try-catch block. It's thrown up to the calling scope.

In [except.throw] (2003 wording):

A throw-expression with no operand rethrows the exception being handled.

and:

When an exception is thrown, control is transferred to the nearest handler with a matching type (15.3); “nearest” means the handler for which the compound-statement, ctor-initializer, or function-body following the try keyword was most recently entered by the thread of control and not yet exited.

Your try block has exited, so its handlers are not candidates. Thus, none of the catch blocks in your code may handle the re-throw.

Admittedly this is rather confusing wording.

share|improve this answer
    
Since the catch block is outside the block following try, the next catch is not eligible. –  Jan Hudec May 31 '11 at 10:23
    
@Jan: I'm getting a headache, but don't the above conditions for "nearest" match? The next catch is a "handler", and the compound-statement following its relating try keyword has not yet exited. Oh, wait, yes it has. OK :D I stand by everything in my answer, but thanks for helping me understand it myself ;) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 10:25
    
Thanks for the reference. As I understand, the exception is only handled if the catch has its own try block. –  user753213 May 31 '11 at 10:51
    
@user753213: I don't follow. "Matches" how? –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 10:52
    
Edited, I meant to say, for a catch that is related with a try block. –  user753213 May 31 '11 at 10:56

Rethrown exception is supposed to be caught by some other try..catch block, not the catch handler of the same try block. See this example:

using namespace std;
class Base
{
public:
    virtual ~Base(){}
};

class Derived : public Base
{
};

void f()
{
    try
    {
        throw Derived();
    }
    catch(Derived& ex)
    {
        cout<<"Caught in f\n";
        throw;
    }

}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        f();
    }
    catch(Base& b)
    {
        cout<<"Caught in main\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

output is:

Caught in f

Caught in main

share|improve this answer
    
Another way to put it: the catch only catches exceptions that try to leave the context of the block immediately following the try keyword. –  Donal Fellows May 31 '11 at 10:14
    
The example seems a little redundant. The question is the example. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 '11 at 10:25

This should work :

Derived D;


try{

    try {
        throw D;
    } catch ( const Derived &d) {
        throw;
    } catch (const Base &b) {
        cout << "caught!" << endl;
    }

} catch (const Base &b) {
    cout << "caught here!" << endl;
}

As other said, the rethrow will rethrow the same exception out of the catch block.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, this is interesting. –  user753213 May 31 '11 at 10:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.