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I have a class (codedUI), containing static properties, which are used to save variables from run to run:

[CodedUITest]
public class SomeClass
{
    public static string MyStaticProp { get; set; }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
         SomeClass.MyStaticProp = "AHA";
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod2()
    {
         string x = SomeClass.MyStaticProp;//when TestMethod1 and TestMethod2 are called from an "ordered test", MyStaticProp is reset everytime. The strange thing: it used to work....
    }
}

I thought MyStaticProp would stay the same from run to run (first run, initial value = null, second run initial value "AHA"). But apparently MyStaticProp is allways reset to null from run to run. Any idea why this could happen?

EDIT: Thank you all for your help! I guess I will create a "DataClass" which will be saved to / loaded from the temp-folder. Like this I can be sure what happens when.

What I still don't get is, why it worked in the past but now it doesn't anymore.

share|improve this question
1  
@Abdul - more accurately, once per-AppDomain, which isn't quite the same; you can have multiple AppDomains per-process – Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 11:26
    
What do you mean by run to run? static variable is initialized once per AppDomain. – Abdul Muqtadir May 31 '11 at 11:34

I think I now understood better the problem, CodedUI doesn't use the same objects between runs nor it seems to use the same AppDomain, the AppDomain used in the last run is probably thrown away. This way CodedUI generates reproducible tests, that are not dependant on a state of a previous run which is fatal.

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If you want some method to be called before all test methods you need to use

one of AssemblyInitialize , ClassInitialize or TestInitialize attribute

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.visualstudio.testtools.unittesting.classinitializeattribute(v=VS.80).aspx

The order that methods will be run is:

  • Methods marked with the AssemblyInitializeAttribute.

  • Methods marked with the ClassInitializeAttribute.

  • Methods marked with the TestInitializeAttribute.

  • Methods marked with the TestMethodAttribute.

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You don't show much detail, but here goes:

  • perhaps the declaring class is generic and the instantiations are for different type parameters - making the static variables different (move it to a non-generic (base) class to counter this behaviour)
  • perhaps you are using a testrunner that dynamically loads the assembly to be tested into an appdomain. Once the appdomain is unloaded, or the assembly is loaded into a new appdomain (visual studio integration, anyone?) the static will have to be re-initialized with the whole of the assembly data segment
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Generally speaking, depending on order of execution is always bad idea in unit testing. Unit test should be independent of each other. For the very same reason, some test runners randomize the tests before execution.

If you need to perform some setup before running tests, you should do it in constructor or [SetUp] method, depending on your unit test framework.

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Every time you call TestMethod1, you set the property to "AHA", aka resetting it.

If you only want it to be set once, either initialize it inside SomeClass when you create it, or make a static contructor inside SomeClass that set the initial value.

Going the static contructor route, it will be like this:

[CodedUITest]
public class SomeClass
{
  public static string MyStaticProp { get; set; }

  static SomeClass(){
    MyStaticProp = "AHA";
  }
  ...
}

Note that still, calling TestMethod1 will change the value of the static property. But adding the initialization inside the static constructor guarantees that the value will be set from there only once, and before the first time it's accessed. Probably what you want.

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