Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i am programming a soundboard from android. the problem is that some sounds works, and some dont work. here is the traceback that i get for the sounds that doesnt work

05-31 13:23:04.227 18440 18603 W System.err: java.io.FileNotFoundException: This file can not be opened as a file descriptor; it is probably compressed
05-31 13:23:04.227 18440 18603 W System.err:    at android.content.res.AssetManager.openAssetFd(Native Method)
05-31 13:23:04.227 18440 18603 W System.err:    at android.content.res.AssetManager.openFd(AssetManager.java:331)
05-31 13:23:04.227 18440 18603 W System.err:    at com.phonegap.AudioPlayer.startPlaying(AudioPlayer.java:201)
05-31 13:23:04.227 18440 18603 W System.err:    at com.phonegap.AudioHandler.startPlayingAudio(AudioHandler.java:181)
05-31 13:23:04.235 18440 18603 W System.err:    at com.phonegap.AudioHandler.execute(AudioHandler.java:64)
05-31 13:23:04.235 18440 18603 W System.err:    at com.phonegap.api.PluginManager$1.run(PluginManager.java:86)
05-31 13:23:04.235 18440 18603 W System.err:    at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:1096)

any ideas?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is a limitations on opening compressed files in the assets folder. This is because uncompressed files can be directly memory mapped into the processes virtual address space, therefore avoiding needing the same amount of memory again for decompression.

Dealing with Asset Compression in Android Apps discusses some techniques in dealing with compressed files. You can trick aapt into not compressing the file by using an extension that is not compressed (e.g. mp3) or you can manually add them to the apk without compression instead of getting aapt to do the work.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, i`ll try this out... –  nomoral May 31 '11 at 12:02
    
Finally, an answer to all of my problems. This is really poorly documented! +1 –  Phil Dec 20 '11 at 19:49
    
The binary asset file I have is around 1.1MB. I renamed it to jpg/png etc so that the compression does not kick in. But when copied to the sdcard, it swells up to ~8MB. So somehow, AssetManager still thinks that it needs to be uncompressed. Does anyone know whats going on here? –  GreenBee May 15 '13 at 18:00
    
After wasting a few hours, I finally managed to read the files off of raw instead of assets and they are not 'uncompressed' any more. –  GreenBee May 15 '13 at 18:14
add comment

You should get this exception only if trying to open the FileDesriptor. For just reading the file you can go the way through the InputStream (AssetManager.open("filename.ext")). This worked for me.

If you need the file size in advance, you need the FileDescriptor (and therefore an uncompressed file) to call its getLength() method, otherwise you have to read the whole stream to determine its size.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This decidedly irritating situation comes about because when the .apk is built, some assets are compressed before storing them, whereas other are treated as already compressed (e.g. images, video) and are left alone. The latter group can be opened using openAssetFd, the former group can't - if you try, you get the "This file can not be opened as a file descriptor; it is probably compressed" error.

One option is to trick the build system into not compressing the assets (see the link in @nicstrong's answer), but this is fiddly. Better to try and work around the problem in a more predictable fashion.

The solution I cam up with uses the fact that while you can't open an AssetFileDescriptor for the asset, you can still open an InputStream. You can use this to copy the asset into the application's file cache, and then return a descriptor for that:

@Override
public AssetFileDescriptor openAssetFile(final Uri uri, final String mode) throws FileNotFoundException
{
    final String assetPath = uri.getLastPathSegment();  // or whatever

    try
    {
        final boolean canBeReadDirectlyFromAssets = ... // if your asset going to be compressed?
        if (canBeReadDirectlyFromAssets)
        {
            return getContext().getAssets().openFd(assetPath);
        }
        else
        {
            final File cacheFile = new File(getContext().getCacheDir(), assetPath);
            cacheFile.getParentFile().mkdirs();
            copyToCacheFile(assetPath, cacheFile);
            return new AssetFileDescriptor(ParcelFileDescriptor.open(cacheFile, MODE_READ_ONLY), 0, -1);
        }
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        throw new FileNotFoundException(ex.getMessage());
    }
}

private void copyToCacheFile(final String assetPath, final File cacheFile) throws IOException
{
    final InputStream inputStream = getContext().getAssets().open(assetPath, ACCESS_BUFFER);
    try
    {
        final FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(cacheFile, false);
        try
        {
            //using Guava IO lib to copy the streams, but could also do it manually
            ByteStreams.copy(inputStream, fileOutputStream); 
        }
        finally
        {
            fileOutputStream.close();
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        inputStream.close();
    }
}

This does mean that your app will leave cache files lying about, but that's fine. It also doesn't attempt to re-use existing cache files, which you may or may not care about.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.