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The output is:

Class A
Class B
printout

Given code:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Class A"
    def printout(self):
        print "printout"

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        print "Class B"

def main():
    myA = A()
    myB = B()
    myB.printout()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

I was hoping for:

Class A
Class A
Class B
printout

as result... :/

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1  
dont put pre tags around code segments, it removes the syntax highlight. –  Mizipzor May 31 '11 at 13:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's because you did not call the superclass's __init__.

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        A.__init__(self)
#       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ this have to be explicitly added
        print "Class B"

In Python 3.x you could use super().__init__() instead of A.__init__(self), but you're still explicitly invoking the superclass's __init__.

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You need to explicitly call the base class constructor like so:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super(B, self).__init__()

In python 3.0 the following is equivilent:

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()
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You didn't call the ancestor constructor, use the super() call for this

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        super(B, self).__init__()
        print "Class B"
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