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There have been some questions asked that are somewhat related to this problem, but they don't seem to fit quite right.

I'm using the Cake pattern to slide a "Storage" system in place in production code, and a stub storage system in for testing purposes. This is all great, but there's a class that's being instantiated within the original class that also needs to have this stub storage system mixed in. Since it's hidden inside the implementation, I don't have access to it.

Things look like this:

class Main { this: Storage =>
  ...
  val used = Used(...)
  ...
}

class Used { this: Storage =>
  ...
}

When testing "Used" I simply new Used with StubStorage and off I go. I used to do the same with Main but that was before it made use of Used. Now that Main makes a naive instantiation of Used I've got this problem.

I wanted to try it this way:

class Main[T <: Storage] { this: T =>
  ...
  val used = Used[T](...)
  ...
}

class Used[T <: Storage] { this: T =>
  ...
}
object Used {
  def apply[T <: Storage](...) = new Used(...) with T
}

But of course that doesn't work because the compiler doesn't have enough information to discover T. Is there a magic recipe for this? I've played around with it for a bit and it seems to be cumbersome enough that the standard OO injection method is actually less trouble, but I could be missing something.

I've looked at the implicit Factory concept but I can't pound that into shape to work for mixins.

EDIT: It's amazing the clarity that writing the question publicly gives. :) I haven't solved the problem the way I originally intended, but there is a simple solution to the actual problem:

trait UsedProvider {
  def createUsed = Used.apply _
}

class Main { this: Storage with UsedProvider =>
  val used = createUsed(...)
}

Then I would just do the following in the test: new Main with StubStorage with StubUsedProvider.

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1 Answer

I haven't solved your original problem either but have you considered using an abstract class for Main and provide the value for used where you need it?

abstract class Main { this: Storage =>
  val s = "s"
  val used: Used
}

Then instantiate like this:

val main = new Main with StubStorage { val used = new Used(s) with StubStorage }
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That would only allow me to create one and I need more than one, which isn't something that was clear in the original question. What I need is a factory method that allows me to create them when I need them. So I'm just using the good ol' cake pattern again to give me that dependency. –  Derek Wyatt Jun 1 '11 at 10:16
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