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How can I rewrite this jQuery to be more terse and without the guard clause?

var myTextBox = $('#myTextBox');

if (myTextBox )
    myTextBox.val("");

The guard clause is there simply to ensure that the element exists on the page before trying to set it's value but the code seems bloated and most of it unnecessary. What's the preferred solution to this?

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

$('#myTextBox').val("") will do nothing if the jQuery object has a length of 0, so simply use it.

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Unless its changed recently, I believe a jQuery object with a length of 0 would have passed that conditional anyway. You probably wanted myTextBox.length instead of just myTextBox –  Jake May 31 '11 at 14:51
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Unless you need to cache the selector for future operations, I would do this:

$('#myTextBox').val("")

If there are none selected, nothing will get enumerated, so jQuery will not run the val() routine.

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I'm not sure I would call that break the chain - it simply returns an empty list so nothing gets enumerated. You can still as many jQuery statements together as you'd like - no chain is 'broken' –  Matt May 31 '11 at 14:01
    
right you are... –  Billy Moon May 31 '11 at 14:04
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It'll work just as $('#myTextBox').val("");, if it finds no object then it will just be an empty jQuery object and the .val() routine will do nothing.

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I believe that if #mytextbox doesn't exist, mytextbox will not be undefined anyway, it will be an empty jQuery object. So the check is redundant.

I also think that if you perform an operation on an empty jQuery object nothing will happen anyway, so you're safe.

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