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So I'm doing one of the Princeton exercises here: http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/fall10/cos126/assignments/lfsr.html and I've fully tested by LFSR class with the data that has been provided, so I'm sure I haven't gone wrong there. However, my PhotoMagic class yields an encrypted photo of the pipe as below: Encrypted photo of the Pipe image

This is not how it should appear. Any idea as to where my code has gone awry?

import java.awt.Color;

public class PhotoMagic 
{
    private LFSR lfsr;

public static void main(String args[])
{
    new PhotoMagic("src/pictures/shield.png","01101000010100010000",16);

}

public PhotoMagic(String imageName,String binaryPassword,int tap)
{
    Picture pic = new Picture(imageName);
    lfsr = new LFSR(binaryPassword,tap);


    for (int x = 0; x < pic.width(); x++) 
    {
        for (int y = 0; y < pic.height(); y++) 
        {
            Color color = pic.get(x, y);
            int red = color.getRed();
            int blue = color.getBlue();
            int green = color.getGreen();
            int transparency = color.getTransparency();
            int alpha = color.getAlpha();

            int newRed = xor(Integer.toBinaryString(red),paddedBitPattern(lfsr.generate(8)));

            int newGreen = xor(Integer.toBinaryString(green),paddedBitPattern(lfsr.generate(8)));

            int newBlue = xor(Integer.toBinaryString(blue),paddedBitPattern(lfsr.generate(8)));

            Color newColor = new Color(newRed, newGreen, newBlue);
            pic.set(x, y, newColor);
        }
    }
    pic.show();
}

/**
 * Pads bit pattern to the left with 0s if it is not 8 bits long
 * @param bitPattern
 * @return 
 */
public String paddedBitPattern(int bitPattern)
{
    String tempBit = Integer.toBinaryString(bitPattern);
    String newPattern = "";
    for(int i = 1; i < 9-tempBit.length(); i++)
    {
        newPattern += "0";
    }
    newPattern += tempBit;
    return newPattern;
}

/**
 * Performs the bitwise XOR
 * @param colorComponent
 * @param generatedBit
 * @return 
 */
public int xor(String colorComponent, String generatedBit)
{
    String newColor = "";

    for(int i = 0; i < colorComponent.length(); i++)
    {
        if(colorComponent.charAt(i) != generatedBit.charAt(i))
        {
            newColor += 1;
        }
        else
        {
            newColor += 0;
        }
    }
    return Integer.valueOf(newColor,2);
}

}

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Why do you transform everything to Strings? You could just use the java xor operator directly on the int's and shrink your code size by half. –  toto2 May 31 '11 at 15:08
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to pad the result of Integer.toBinaryString() when calculating newRed, newGreen and newBlue. It may not have length 8.

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+1 A good point. If you were dealing with 16 bit RGBA values, then the entire upper bytes would be completely unaffected. –  Edwin Buck May 31 '11 at 14:47
    
thanks! this is indeed the bug! the program works now and images can be encrypted and decrypted as per the assignment now. –  nope May 31 '11 at 15:00
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The issue is likely in this block of code

public String paddedBitPattern(int bitPattern)
{
    String tempBit = Integer.toBinaryString(bitPattern);
    String newPattern = "";
    for(int i = 1; i < 9-tempBit.length(); i++)
    {
        newPattern += "0";
    }
    newPattern += tempBit;
    return newPattern;
}

Note that your newPattern starts off as the string of length zero, and then you add a text zero to it for each of the bits in bitPattern. Then you add the bitPattern back into the newPattern and return the result. This leads to a 100% non-random result which is a zero padded version of the same bitPattern you just submitted.

So if the input is

0010101101

the output will be

00000000000010101101

Which (when dropping the leading zeros) is exactly the input

0010101101

Since there is no added complexity, it doesn't mess up the mind's ability at edge detection: is quite easy to see the pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry if it was unclear, but the only arguments passed into the method are decimal numbers between and inclusive 0-255, it would simply the binary equivalent if it was less than 8 bits long. so 42 in binary is 101010, but the method will pad it so it will look like 00101010, which allows for the xor method to manipulate it. so the bug is something else. –  nope May 31 '11 at 14:31
    
@tomejuan, ok, so its' supposed to be a bit to string converter only. However, an XOR implementation cannot blend beyond the single bit it contains. That means that if you don't shift your bits (via rotation or some other means), you get back data that preserves trends in values beyond the boundary of the length of your key. Pictures only need a few boundaries here and there to be recogonizable, so you will get back something that looks like a pipe labeled "this is not a pipe". If you want to extend your key to 8x8 bits, rotate the key after each pass to paddedBitPattern by one bit. –  Edwin Buck May 31 '11 at 14:36
    
@tomejuan, in addition 8 bits is a very bad boundary for an XOR encryption on an image. It's used because it is computationally efficient and easy to program; but, the boundaries of RGBA has 8 bits for Red, Green, Blue, and Alpha. So, every bit is only altered in color, independent of what pixel lies next to it. Humans can easily recognize a tree, even if it is blue. Color shifting isn't going to make your picture less recognizable. –  Edwin Buck May 31 '11 at 14:41
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