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At first, I was going to do something like the following:

public void WriteToFile(string filePath, string contents)
{
    try
    {
        File.WriteAllText(filePath, contents)
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        //Log error
    }
}

But then I decided to catch all the specific exceptions for the method WriteAllText, like the following:

public void WriteToFile(string filePath, string contents)
{
    try
    {
        File.WriteAllText(filePath, contents);
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
        //An I/O error occured when opening the file
    }
    catch (ArgumentException ex)
    {
       //The exception that is thrown when one of the arguments provided to a method   
         that is not valid.
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
    {
       //Unauthorized access
    }
    catch (SecurityException ex)
    {
        //Security exception
    }
    catch (NotSupportedException ex)
    {
        //Invoked method not supported
    } 
}

The above is very verbose and with other methods, it could be more. Is there a better way to do this so I don't have to write so many catch statements. Also, if an exception is caught, is it best to return from it, log it. I always get confused on how to handle it.

I have noticed some confusion. I am going to handle the exceptions, I left out handling the exception to keep this short. I am going to make use of the ex variable. The question is more about doing just catch(Exception ex) or multiple catch statements.

I also bring this up because I always here that it is better to handle specific exceptions rather than a catch-all. If I have misunderstood this, please clarify on what it means.

share|improve this question
4  
If you don't know how to handle an exception, you shouldn't catch it in the first place. – SLaks May 31 '11 at 15:13
    
@SLaks, my main question is not how to handle, I have an idea (I was just asking for recommendations). The main question of the post is instead of catching Exception, what is the best way to avoid writing multiple catch statements. – Xaisoft May 31 '11 at 15:15
    
There is some confusion with my post, I will update. – Xaisoft May 31 '11 at 15:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on how you are handling the exception. For example, if a SecurityException will cause you to present a dialog to the user to provide their credentials, then you should have a separate catch clause. If not, there is no need to explicitly call them all out.

E.g.

try
{
    File.WriteAllText(filePath, contents);
}
catch (SecurityException ex)
{
    //present dialog
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    //All other exceptions handled the same
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't look to bad. Most likely the exception would be an I/O error, so that means I would catch an IOException followed by all Exceptions. Correct? – Xaisoft May 31 '11 at 15:25
    
It is a bad practice to handle the base Exception class. This will cause you to catch exceptions that you are extremely unlikely to be able to handle, such as out-of-memory or stack-overflow exceptions. Just stick with the specific exceptions that are expected. (The exception to this is in the thread or processes's unhandled exception handler. – Jeffrey L Whitledge May 31 '11 at 15:37
    
Again, you should think about what you do with the exception. I would expect that FileNotFoundException would be the most common exception. What do you want to do with these exceptions? – David V May 31 '11 at 15:38
    
@Jeffrey - good point about the base class. – David V May 31 '11 at 15:39

Typicaly, your try/catch statements will be much further up the call stack from what you are showing in the question. There are two major reasons for this. First is that a low-level method will not know how to deal with an exception that happens within it, because it does not have enough context. If a low-level method (such as one that saves a document) does know enough about its circumstances to handle the exceptions, then that is a sign of a leaky abstraction. Second is that the program flow at higher levels will depend on whether the save operation succeeded or not. For these reasons, all of these types of exceptions are best delt with at the highest levels, such as in the UI layer.

That said, sometimes a long list of exceptions—as you have it—is exactly the way to go. If you need to handle a bunch of different circumstances, then it calls for a bunch of different catch statements, and that's just the way it goes.

Some of those exceptions, however, do not need to be caught. For example, an ArgumentException never needs to be caught. Instead, it is best just to pass the correct arguments every time. The only time an ArgumentException will ever need to be caught is if you are calling into a poory designed library in which you cannot know beforehand whether an argument is good or not. A well-designed library will provide alternatives to this.

So the list of catch statements could be made shorter, just by judiciously examining the circumstances of each type of exception and determining which ones are actually expected to happen.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know if there is a way to find out the order the exceptions would be thrown? I don't mean the order they are caught, but assume you run the code and every exception can be thrown, is there a way to find out which one would be thrown first? – Xaisoft May 31 '11 at 15:35
    
@Xaisoft - I take it that you mean, if two exceptional circumstances exist, can you determine which of the two exceptions will be thrown? I don't believe that is usually documented for most APIs. You could always view the source code and see which one comes first, but you shouldn't rely on undocumented behavior, since it could change in future versions. With respect to file operations, some of these things may depend on the version of the operating system that is being used as well. – Jeffrey L Whitledge May 31 '11 at 15:40
    
While it is true that code for lower level operations often won't really know how exceptions should be dealt with, I don't know that code for higher-level operations will be in a better situation. Proper recovery requires knowing the difference between actual and expected state. Higher-level code knows what's expected, but only the lower-level code knows what state actually exists. Unfortunately, most of the exception hierarchy does not effectively convey the most important piece of information regarding an exception, which is the extent to which the failed call has affected system state. – supercat Apr 5 '12 at 23:39
    
@supercat - If the system state is unknown in some important way, then it would be best to just log the exception and bail. But in my experience that should not normally be necessary. Low-level systems—if properly designed—can maintain their invariants even in the face of exceptions. (The finally statement is very useful for this purpose.) If an exception is truly unknown or unexpected, then the program should, of course, be terminated quickly. But most exceptions can be planned for, and that is especially true if one handles them at the proper level. – Jeffrey L Whitledge Apr 6 '12 at 14:18
    
@JeffreyLWhitledge: Consider the scenario of a routine which is supposed to do an "in-place" merge of items from some data source into a collection. The collection may have no clue which data-source problems the application is prepared to deal with. Further, the application may have to handle differently the case where an exception leaves the collection completely unmodified versus incompletely modified. At what layer should the various possible exceptions be caught, and how should they be passed up the stack? – supercat Apr 9 '12 at 17:39

I agree with SLaks above. If you don't handle it there is no reason in catching specific exceptions. If you can handle certain exceptions but not others you should have a catch all that at least logs vital information about the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I left out the actual handling to keep it short. I updated my post. – Xaisoft May 31 '11 at 15:20
    
Ah I see. Thanks for the clarification. – Cole W May 31 '11 at 15:20

The best method very much depends on the nature of your application and the expectations of the user. If you are creating a Word processing application and your operation above was to save the user's document, swallowing the exception and logging without notifying the user would be very bad! In this context, I would catch the specific exceptions so that I could better report to the user what the problem is.

If instead the file you are saving is non-critical, e.g. a period caching of some data that is retained in memory, you might want to simply log and not notify the user. In this context, I would go for a generic catch-all and just log the exception details.

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