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We have a huge InnoDB table (153G) that we need to move to another server. We use innodb_file_per_table. Is there a way to copy just the IBD file somehow? How would target DB recognize the file and know about its metadata? If needed, we can stop the DB for the copying.

EDITED: One of the big tables is this:

CREATE TABLE `140M_table` (
  `field1` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `field2` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
  `field3` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field4` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field5` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field6` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field7` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field8` bigint(20) DEFAULT NULL,
  `field9` varchar(20) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`field1`),
  KEY `captureDateIdx` (`field2`,`feild6`),
  KEY `personaSubIdx` (`field3`,`field6`,`field5`),
  KEY `FKE6B5072DF27AF1FE` (`field8`),
  KEY `FKE6B5072D54F7256A` (`field7`),
  KEY `temp_key_idx` (`field9`),
  CONSTRAINT `FKE6B5072D54F7256A` FOREIGN KEY (`field7`) REFERENCES `small_table`     (`field7`),
  CONSTRAINT `FKE6B5072DF27AF1FE` FOREIGN KEY (`field8`) REFERENCES `2M_table` (`field9`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=136181731 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
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3  
Why not temporarily set up async replication? That way you'll even get new and modified data while copying... –  Denis May 31 '11 at 15:43
    
This is done for migration. We need to minimize the downtime window. Because of that we want to import big tables on separate machines and then combine them in one DB. –  Philopator May 31 '11 at 18:02
    
Which was the whole point of my question... you'd have a downtime of zero if you async replicate it. –  Denis May 31 '11 at 21:59
    
We migrate from MS SQL server by exporting and importing gigantic CSV files. Because it takes too long to import a CSV, we thought of doing it in parallel, and then combining binary IDB files. –  Philopator Jun 1 '11 at 12:53
1  
Please get in the habit of accepting the best answer provided, the one solving your problem. It's the right and polite thing to do on StackOverflow and serves as an incentive for others to continue to help those looking for answers. See the FAQ –  marc_s Dec 1 '11 at 16:37
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2 Answers

You can't just copy InnoDB tables. Even with innodb_file_per_table all InnoDB files share a central "cache" file (ibdata#, ib_logfile#), which are stored in the root level of the mysql data directory.

You need to copy ALL the InnoDB tables plus the shared cache files to the new server, or dump the table. Dumping the table can take quite a bit longer since you are "moving" the data 3 time (dump, copy, restore). Make sure your InnoDB settings in my.cnf are the same on both servers, otherwise you will get errors when you try to startup mysql on the new server.

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That's what i thought, but the problem is what happens to ibdata, ib_logfile of the target environment. The idea was to load one big table on comp1, another big table on comp2, then move second table from comp2 to comp1. If we copy ibdata, ib_logfile, that would kill contents of comp1. Even if we move it to comp3, we cannot move both comp1 and comp2's ibdata and ib_logfile. –  Philopator Jun 3 '11 at 19:04
    
Sounds like you are trying to merge two systems. You can't do that with InnoDB tables. Dumping is really the only/quickest way. You can probably speed things up by nfs mounting comp1 on comp2 and dumping directly to the mount. Then you avoid a dump+copy. –  Brent Baisley Jun 4 '11 at 0:06
    
@brent-baisley, if i to mysqldump, i need to load it, which is as slow as running LOAD DATA INFILE. –  Philopator Jun 6 '11 at 15:20
    
There aren't many options when it comes to InnoDB tables. You can speed up import by allocating a lot of memory to your key cache and sort buffers. It's index creation that usually slows things down. Change the values back to normal when you are done. –  Brent Baisley Jun 7 '11 at 0:09
    
@brent-baisley, thanks for the info. I was just wondering what params set key cache and sort buffers for InnoDB. I found such params for MyISAM, but i'm not sure they apply to InnoDB. –  Philopator Jun 7 '11 at 14:42
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With the help of partition the problem would be resolved as ubder:

CREATE TABLE test_part_innodb (c1 int default NULL, c2 varchar(30) default NULL, c3 date default NULL) engine=InnoDB
-> PARTITION BY RANGE (year(c3)) (PARTITION p0 VALUES LESS THAN (2000),
-> PARTITION p1 VALUES LESS THAN (2001) , PARTITION p2 VALUES LESS THAN (2002) ,
-> PARTITION p3 VALUES LESS THAN (2003) , PARTITION p4 VALUES LESS THAN (2004) ,
-> PARTITION p5 VALUES LESS THAN (2005) , PARTITION p6 VALUES LESS THAN (2006) ,
-> PARTITION p7 VALUES LESS THAN (2007) , PARTITION p8 VALUES LESS THAN (2008) ,
-> PARTITION p9 VALUES LESS THAN (2009) , PARTITION p10 VALUES LESS THAN (2010),
-> PARTITION p99 VALUES LESS THAN MAXVALUE );
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.13 sec)



show create table test_part_innodb\G;
*************************** 1. row ***************************
Table: test_part_innodb
Create Table: CREATE TABLE `test_part_innodb` (
`c1` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
`c2` varchar(30) DEFAULT NULL,
`c3` date DEFAULT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
/*!50100 PARTITION BY RANGE (year(c3))
(PARTITION p0 VALUES LESS THAN (2000) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p1 VALUES LESS THAN (2001) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p2 VALUES LESS THAN (2002) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p3 VALUES LESS THAN (2003) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p4 VALUES LESS THAN (2004) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p5 VALUES LESS THAN (2005) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p6 VALUES LESS THAN (2006) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p7 VALUES LESS THAN (2007) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p8 VALUES LESS THAN (2008) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p9 VALUES LESS THAN (2009) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p10 VALUES LESS THAN (2010) ENGINE = InnoDB,
PARTITION p99 VALUES LESS THAN MAXVALUE ENGINE = InnoDB) */
1 row in set (0.00 sec)


delimiter //
CREATE PROCEDURE load_test_part_innodb()
begin
do
declare v int default 0;
while v do
insert into test_part_innodb
values (v,'testing partitions',adddate('2000-01-01',(rand(v)*36520) mod 3652));
set v = v + 1;
end while;
end
// 
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

delimiter ;
call load_test_part_innodb();
Query OK, 1 row affected (1 hour 11 min 25.19 sec)

select count(*) from test_part_innodb where c3 > date '2000-01-01' and c3 < date '2000-12-31';
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 99681 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.22 sec)


show create view part_backup\G;
    *************************** 1. row ***************************
    View: part_backup
    Create View: CREATE ALGORITHM=UNDEFINED DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` SQL SECURITY DEFINER VIEW `part_backup` AS select

    concat('mysqldump',' -u root',' -p ',' --no-create-info',' --where="',(case `p2`.`PARTITION_METHOD` when 'hash' then
    concat(`p2`.`PARTITION_EXPRESSION`,' % ',(select count(0) from `information_schema`.`partitions` `p3` where ((`p3`.`TABLE_SCHEMA` =
    `p2`.`TABLE_SCHEMA`) and (`p3`.`TABLE_NAME` = `p2`.`TABLE_NAME`))),' = ',(`p2`.`PARTITION_ORDINAL_POSITION` - 1)) when 'list' then
    concat(`p2`.`PARTITION_EXPRESSION`,' in (',`p2`.`PARTITION_DESCRIPTION`,')') when 'range' then
    concat(if((`p2`.`PARTITION_ORDINAL_POSITION` = 1),'',concat(`p2`.`PARTITION_EXPRESSION`,' >=
    ',replace(`p1`.`PARTITION_DESCRIPTION`,'MAXVALUE',~(0)),' and ')),concat(`p2`.`PARTITION_EXPRESSION`,'
    ',`p2`.`TABLE_SCHEMA`,'.',`p2`.`TABLE_NAME`) AS `Name_exp_1` from (`information_schema`.`partitions` `p2` left join
    `information_schema`.`partitions` `p1` on(((`p1`.`TABLE_SCHEMA` = `p2`.`TABLE_SCHEMA`) and (`p1`.`TABLE_NAME` = `p2`.`TABLE_NAME`) and

    ((`p1`.`PARTITION_ORDINAL_POSITION` + 1) = `p2`.`PARTITION_ORDINAL_POSITION`)))) where ((`p2`.`TABLE_SCHEMA` = database()) and
    (`p2`.`PARTITION_METHOD` in ('hash','list','range')))
    character_set_client: utf8
    collation_connection: utf8_general_ci
    1 row in set (0.01 sec)

desc part_backup;
+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Name_exp_1 | mediumtext | YES | | NULL | |
+------------+------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.02 sec)

select * from part_backup;
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Thanks. This looks like an interesting solution, but it's somewhat complicated at the same time. Also, it seems to rely on mysqldump. Using mysqldump and then loading the dump, is as slow as just doing the LOAD DATA INFILE. –  Philopator Jun 6 '11 at 15:22
    
@Philopator This process is used where data is very large as in present case the Data is about 153GB and while doing through mysqldump have to write the data continually and if it take 1 minute to write 1 GB data it would take 153 which is around 2.5 hours another thing the database size is 153GB but the dump size would be atlest 160GB as adding of " and , Another thing how to carry the 153GB database, the only method is done through taking hard disk. But in this method fragments can be made and each fragment can be zipped which would reduce size about 50% and easily transfer the data –  Vineet1982 Jun 6 '11 at 21:05
    
I think the problem would be in loading of mysqldump. That would take forever. But thanks for the idea. –  Philopator Jun 7 '11 at 14:20
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