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I need to assure that a value is unique in two columns (this is not a "two columns" index issue).

Table A
Column A1       Column A2

Memphis         New York     -> ok
San Francisco   Miami        -> ok
Washington      Chicago      -> ok
Miami           Las Vegas    -> Forbidden ! Miami already exists 

Is it possible ?

My example is with cities but don't focalize on that. My real need is about generated hexadecimal ids.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to add a constraint trigger that looks it up after insert/update.

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Before insert/update, right? –  Andrew Lazarus May 31 '11 at 21:22
    
I'd use after, myself, since subsequent before triggers may change the row's values if you use a before trigger. –  Denis de Bernardy May 31 '11 at 22:00
    
Isn't an after trigger too late to cancel the insert/update operation if the uniqueness fails? –  Andrew Lazarus May 31 '11 at 22:23
    
You can raise an exception if needed. –  Denis de Bernardy May 31 '11 at 22:30
    
@Andrew Lazarus: As far as I know, an AFTER trigger is invoked within the same transaction as the statement that has invoked it. So in the AFTER trigger you can just rollback the transaction and, if needed, call RAISERROR too. –  Andriy M Jun 4 '11 at 9:19

In SQL Server it is possible to enforce the uniqueness with the help of an indexed view. You will also need a numbers table (if you haven't already got one) in the same database as your Table A.

Here's my testing script with some comments:

CREATE TABLE MyNumbersTable (Value int);
-- You need at least 2 rows, by the number of columns
-- you are going to implement uniqueness on
INSERT INTO MyNumbersTable
SELECT 1 UNION ALL
SELECT 2;
GO
CREATE TABLE MyUniqueCities (  -- the main table
  ID int IDENTITY,
  City1 varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  City2 varchar(50) NOT NULL
);
GO
CREATE VIEW MyIndexedView
WITH SCHEMABINDING  -- this is required for creating an indexed view
AS
SELECT
  City = CASE t.Value    -- after supplying the numbers table
    WHEN 1 THEN u.City1  -- with the necessary number of rows
    WHEN 2 THEN u.City2  -- you can extend this CASE expression
  END                    -- to add more columns to the constraint
FROM dbo.MyUniqueCities u
  INNER JOIN dbo.MyNumbersTable t
    ON t.Value BETWEEN 1 AND 2  -- change here too for more columns
GO
-- the first index on an indexed view *must* be unique,
-- which suits us perfectly
CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX UIX_MyIndexedView ON MyIndexedView (City)
GO
-- the first two rows insert fine
INSERT INTO MyUniqueCities VALUES ('London', 'New York');
INSERT INTO MyUniqueCities VALUES ('Amsterdam', 'Prague');
-- the following insert produces an error, because of 'London'
INSERT INTO MyUniqueCities VALUES ('Melbourne', 'London');
GO
DROP VIEW MyIndexedView
DROP TABLE MyUniqueCities
DROP TABLE MyNumbersTable
GO

Useful reading:

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Is this solution compatible with 9.999.999.999.999.999 different values ? –  Zofren Jun 3 '11 at 22:15
    
@Zofren: To be honest, I don't know. –  Andriy M Jun 4 '11 at 9:08

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