Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing conjugate-gradient method realization.

I use Java multi threading for matrix back-substitution. Synchronization is made using CyclicBarrier, CountDownLatch.

Why it takes so much time to synchronize threads? Are there other ways to do it?

code snippet

private void syncThreads() {

    // barrier.await();

    try {

        barrier.await();

    } catch (InterruptedException e) {

    } catch (BrokenBarrierException e) {

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
It all depends on how you separate work between the threads. The more independent they are, the less they synchronize, the faster your program will be. Another thing -- do you have multi core computer? –  Piotr Findeisen May 31 '11 at 15:54
3  
context switching is a bitch ... –  Jarrod Roberson May 31 '11 at 15:55
    
@Piotr - multiple cores won't actually help unless the JVM is built to take advantage of them. –  Ted Hopp May 31 '11 at 15:58
    
Synchronization takes about 2 micro-seconds. This means if you use spend less than 2 micro-second doing useful work, you are better off using 1 thread without synchronisation. –  Peter Lawrey May 31 '11 at 15:58
1  
@Ted, Java only used green threads in 1.0 version on Solaris. Support has been in the JVM on Windows/Linux all along. I didn't think of Android, but it doesn't have a JVM ;) –  Peter Lawrey May 31 '11 at 16:31
show 4 more comments

5 Answers

How many threads are being used in total? That is likely the source of your problem. Using multiple threads will only really give a performance boost if:

  • Each task in the thread does some sort of blocking. For example, waiting on I/O. Using multiple threads in this case enables that blocking time to be used by other threads.
  • or You have multiple cores. If you have 4 cores or 4 CPUs, you can do 4 tasks simultaneously (or 4 threads).

It sounds like you are not blocking in the threads so my guess is you are using too many threads. If you are for example using 10 different threads to do the work at the same time but only have 2 cores, that would likely be much slower than running all of the tasks in sequence. Generally start the number of threads equal to your number of cores/CPUs. Increase the threads used slowly gaging the performance each time. This will give you the optimal thread count to use.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answer, there are 4 cores and 4 threads, so... –  Egor Ivanov May 31 '11 at 16:23
    
@Egor Is there any contention on the data? you might have multiple threads blocking on access to objects. –  Chris Dail May 31 '11 at 16:25
    
+1 : good answer –  Suhail Gupta May 31 '11 at 16:46
    
Good to point out the possibility of contention on the data. –  CPerkins May 31 '11 at 19:51
add comment

You need to ensure that each thread spends more time doing useful work than it costs in overhead to pass a task to another thread.

Here is an example of where the overhead of passing a task to another thread far outweighs the benefits of using multiple threads.

final double[] results = new double[10*1000*1000];
{
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    // using a plain loop.
    for(int i=0;i<results.length;i++) {
        results[i] = (double) i * i;
    }
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("With one thread it took %.1f ns per square%n", (double) time / results.length);
}
{
    ExecutorService ex = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(4);
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    // using a plain loop.
    for(int i=0;i<results.length;i++) {
        final int i2 = i;
        ex.execute(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                results[i2] = i2 * i2;

            }
        });
    }
    ex.shutdown();
    ex.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("With four threads it took %.1f ns per square%n", (double) time / results.length);
}

prints

With one thread it took 1.4 ns per square
With four threads it took 715.6 ns per square

Using multiple threads is much worse.

However, increase the amount of work each thread does and

final double[] results = new double[10 * 1000 * 1000];
{
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    // using a plain loop.
    for (int i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
        results[i] = Math.pow(i, 1.5);
    }
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("With one thread it took %.1f ns per pow 1.5%n", (double) time / results.length);
}
{
    int threads = 4;
    ExecutorService ex = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(threads);
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    int blockSize = results.length / threads;
    // using a plain loop.
    for (int i = 0; i < threads; i++) {
        final int istart = i * blockSize;
        final int iend = (i + 1) * blockSize;
        ex.execute(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                for (int i = istart; i < iend; i++)
                    results[i] = Math.pow(i, 1.5);
            }
        });
    }
    ex.shutdown();
    ex.awaitTermination(1, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("With four threads it took %.1f ns per pow 1.5%n", (double) time / results.length);
}

prints

With one thread it took 287.6 ns per pow 1.5
With four threads it took 77.3 ns per pow 1.5

That's an almost 4x improvement.

share|improve this answer
2  
nice example +1 –  Thomas Jungblut May 31 '11 at 18:38
1  
Really excellent analysis. –  CPerkins May 31 '11 at 19:50
add comment

Perhaps you could try to implement to re-implement your code using fork/join from JDK 7 and see what it does?

The default creates a thread-pool with exactly the same amount of threads as you have cores in your system. If you choose the threshold for dividing your work into smaller chunks reasonably this will probably execute much more efficient.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You are most likely aware of this, but in case you aren't, please read up on Amdahl's Law. It gives the relationship between expected speedup of a program by using parallelism and the sequential segments of the program.

share|improve this answer
add comment

synchronizing across cores is much slower than on a single cored environment see if you can limit the jvm to 1 core (see this blog post)

or you can use a ExecuterorService and use invokeAll to run the parallel tasks

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.