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I have a solution that is client server. The client and the server are projects in the same solution.

I want to unit test the client, which, obviously, requires that the server be running. Is there some way to specify in the unit test project that the server project should be started before running a particular unit test? I suppose I could explicitly start the program, but I'd rather have the testing infrastructure do that for me.

I imagine this is a pretty common requirement. How do people typically approach it? (VS2010, C# if it matters.)

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1  
As maple_shaft wrote: that's probably not the best way to go about unit testing. If you are looking for an integration test, you can use the TestInitialize attribute to startup the server/client each time to a 'neutral' testing state. – Steven Jeuris May 31 '11 at 16:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The best approach to this is to actually write REAL unit tests. What you are running now is considered an integration test.

A true unit test is system indepenent and repeatable, and should make one assertion of functionality for one component. By system independent I mean that it should not depend on a running instance of a server, web services, database, file resource, etc...

You can acheive this unit test by 'Mocking' the server component to return predictable controlled output for the purposes of testing your client code. There are a variety of mocking frameworks available for you to sample.

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4  
All well and good, but I would consider a working integration test an important piece here, so may as well write a working integration test too. Ideally in addition to isolated unit tests. – Marc Gravell May 31 '11 at 16:36
1  
Good point Marc, on that note I probably didn't effectively answer the OP's question. – maple_shaft May 31 '11 at 17:33

Pedant point: if the server is needed, it isn't a unit-test - it is an integration test. That doesn't change the very real need to do it, though :)

When I need this, I design the server as something I can spin up from a few classes anywhere (the simpler, the better); then, you can start the server in a few classes from the test suite (and shut down). The server "application" is then just a thin shell around the same set of classes.

It depends on what you are doing, of course.

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Agreed, you should be writing proper unit tests that test in isolation, but eventually you will need to test against the concrete dependencies. To write integration tests that works against the external process, there are a few options to do this.

TestRun start / stop

Within MSTest, you can perform common setup initialization before any test runs using the the AssemblyInitializeAttribute. Note that the methods must be static.

[TestClass]
public class AssemblyTestHarness
{
    [AssemblyInitialize]
    public static void InitializeAssembly(TestContext context)
    {
        // start process here
    }

    [AssemblyCleanup]
    public static void CleanupAssembly(TestContext context)
    {
        // clean-up process here
    }
}

Test Fixture start / stop

If you need to start and stop the service between a series of tests, you can start and stop the service at the fixture initialize and clean-up.

[TestClass]
public class MyTestFixture
{
    [ClassInitialize]
    public static void InitializeFixture(TestContext context)
    {
        // start process here
    }

    [ClassCleanup]
    public static void CleanupFixture(TestContext context)
    {
        // clean-up process here
    }
}
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It is not entirely necessary to have the server running. In fact, it is probably better NOT to have it running (you will end up testing the network as well as your application).

Another approach is to use a mocking framework such as MoQ or RhinoMock. You can effectively stub out your server using these frameworks, and make them only return what you want them to return, rather than having a series of obscure test only arguments for your server application.

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no. that isn't unit testing. you shouldn't be testing the client to server through unit tests. In order to do that you need to Mock what the server returns within your unit tests. That is the way to "unit test" your client server code.

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you should just stub out the server using an isolation framework as Moq/RhinoMock or what ever you prefer.An unit test should not depend by starting/running something :probabily you will test the client with the real server component on your Integration Test.

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