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In Mathematica, how can I simplify expressions like a == b || a == -b into a^2 = b^2? Every function that I have tried (including Reduce, Simplify, and FullSimplify) does not do it.

Note that I want this to work for an arbitrary (polynomial) expressions a and b. As another example,

a == b || a == -b || a == i b || a == -i b

(for imaginary i) and

a^2 == b^2 || a^2 == -b^2

should both be simplified to a^4 == b^4.

Note: the solution should work at the logical level so as not to harm other unrelated logical cases. For example,

a == b || a == -b || c == d

should become

a^2 == b^2 || c == d.
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2  
your desired simplification is mathematically incorrect. In the above example I assume you want a^2==b^2, right? –  Sjoerd C. de Vries May 31 '11 at 16:37
    
Unless a is absolutely guaranteed to have absolute values of 1 or 0, that's not a simplification, but rather a new expression. Try with values of 2 for a and b. Using the absolute values works for real numbers, but not when extending it to the complex plane. –  David Thornley May 31 '11 at 16:37
    
you can't, because a==+-b and a^2 == b are not equivalent. a==+-b and a^2==b^2 are. –  Woodrow Douglass May 31 '11 at 16:38
    
@Sjoerd C. de Vries Yes, thanks for pointing that out. –  Tyson Williams May 31 '11 at 16:52
    
@Woodrow Douglass My math had a mistake. Please see the new version. –  Tyson Williams May 31 '11 at 16:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The Boolean expression can be converted to the algebraic form as follows:

In[18]:= (a == b || a == -b || a == I b || a == -I b) /. {Or -> Times,
    Equal -> Subtract} // Expand

Out[18]= a^4 - b^4


EDIT

In response to making the transformation leave out parts in other variables, one can write Or transformation function, and use in Simplify:

In[41]:= Clear[OrCombine];
OrCombine[Verbatim[Or][e__Equal]] := Module[{g},
  g = GatherBy[{e}, Variables[Subtract @@ #] &];
  Apply[Or, 
   Function[
     h, ((Times @@ (h /. {Equal -> Subtract})) // Expand) == 0] /@ g]
  ]

In[43]:= OrCombine[(a == b || a == -b || a == I b || a == -I b || 
   c == d)]

Out[43]= a^4 - b^4 == 0 || c - d == 0

Alternatively:

In[40]:= Simplify[(a == b || a == -b || a == I b || a == -I b || 
   c == d), TransformationFunctions -> {Automatic, OrCombine}]

Out[40]= a^4 == b^4 || c == d
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, similar to Daniel's but different too. The result isn't an equation anymore, though. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries May 31 '11 at 16:46
    
I think Daniel and I offered essentially the same solutions, independently. Equality in mine is trivially obtained by equating the resulting polynomial to zero. –  Sasha May 31 '11 at 16:52
1  
Although this is a solution for the problem exactly as I stated it, the solution should not harm other, non-related cases. For example, (a == b || a == -b || a == I b || a == -I b || c == d) /. {Or -> Times, Equal -> Subtract} // Expand should be a^4 == b^4 || c ==d, not a^4 c - b^4 c - a^4 d + b^4 d`. –  Tyson Williams May 31 '11 at 16:58
    
or at least something like a^4 == b^4 || c == d. –  Tyson Williams May 31 '11 at 17:08
    
While both answers are good, I am picking this answer as the correct one because of the slight advantage that the result is still a logical expression. –  Tyson Williams Jun 1 '11 at 13:03

Could convert set of possibilities to a product that must equal zero.

expr = a == b || a == -b || a == I*b || a == -I*b;
eqn = Apply[Times, Apply[Subtract, expr, 1]] == 0

Out[30]= (a - b)*(a - I*b)*(a + I*b)*(a + b) == 0

Now simplify that.

Simplify[eqn]

Out[32]= a^4 == b^4

Daniel Lichtblau

share|improve this answer
    
This solution seem to work pretty well. –  Tyson Williams May 31 '11 at 17:03

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