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I'm a little confused about how C++ handles includes.

I have something like:

typedef struct {
  //struct fields
} Vertex;

#include "GenericObject.h"

Now in GenericObject.h I have:

class GenericObject {
  public:
    Vertex* vertices; 
}

When I try to compile, the compiler says:

ISO C++ forbids declaration of 'Vertex' with no type

How do I get GenericObject.h to know about Vertex?

I was under the impression that anything defined before an #include, was available in the included files.

And lastly, could you give me some tips on how to correctly use #include without introducing too much redundancy or circular includes.

Thanks.

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2  
This should work, so there must be something about your code that you're not telling us! Could you provide a minimal, (non-)compilable example that demonstrates the problem? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:13
    
I notice a missing ';' in the class GenericObject definition in 'GenericObject.h'. Rest seems fine to me and the compiler too. –  hackworks May 31 '11 at 17:20
    
Don't do that, just define "Vertex.h" with the Vertex struct (you may prefer "class"? I usually use struct it just for extern "C" structs and structs with only public fields) and include it where you need it as Tomalak told. Not everything that is permitted by C/C+ is good and I think is not bad to not have a deep knowledge of bad practices. –  ceztko May 31 '11 at 17:22
    
"was available in the included files" - that's probably the wrong way to think about it, whether something is available in the included files. It's available in the translation unit after the point where it's defined, and the TU contains a copy-paste of the included file. Naturally, if your headers start relying on their containing TU to define things for them, then eventually you'll have a situation where it's "available in the included file" for some TUs but not others. Hence, it's a property of the TU and not of the header. –  Steve Jessop May 31 '11 at 17:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Two things, first you want it to just be...

struct Vertex
{
//struct fields
};

That is a properly defined struct in C++. Now you either need to include Vertex.h, or what ever file contains the vertex struct, in your generic object header,

#include "Vertex.h"
class GenericObject {
public:
   Vertex* vertices; 
};

or forward declare it as so...

struct Vertex;
class GenericObject {
  public:
    Vertex* vertices; 
};

don't #include "GenericObject.h" from "Vertex.h".

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3  
No, he/she shouldn't need to forward-declare it in this scenario. Take a look at the OP's code snippet again. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:14
    
@Oli Charlesworth This is true, however the way he/she has his/her includes setup is in bad form and is likely directly resulting in the issues he/she is experiencing. advisaile is clearly new to this, so instead of highlighting hacks, shouldn't we demonstrate good form? –  Skyler Saleh May 31 '11 at 17:22
    
I agree. I see that you've refactored your answer, so I'll remove my downvote... –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:23
    
I've modified my code according to what you suggested and now it works.I moved the Vertex structure in a new file.It seems that the problem was caused by the fact that I didn't correctly define my structure according to C++ standards. Thank you for your answers, and thanks to everyone who helped me out.I think I have a better grasp of the include mechanisms now. –  adivasile Jun 1 '11 at 11:16

I was under the impression that anything defined before an #include, was available in the included files.

Yes (so I'm not sure what's going on your code), but please don't rely on this!. A header should be self-contained, and should absolutely not rely on what's been included in other files before it, outside of its "scope".

(As an aside, this rule applies also for using declarations: do not write using namespace std in your header A, as you may find that you end up accidentally relying on that being present from your headers B and C that include header A!)

  • Where you use Vertex, #include the header that defines it.

  • Where you use merely Vertex* or Vertex&, you can usually just forward-declare the type: struct Vertex;. This helps to avoid circular dependencies.

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To answer your second question about circular includes. This is how most people do it. For example to include the header.h

#ifndef HEADER_H
#define HEADER_H


//you code here


#endif
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One way around this is to "forward-declare" the vertex structure:

//
// GenericObject.h
//

struct Vertex;

class GenericObject {
{
   public:
      Vertex *vertices;
};

Note at this point Vertex is an "incomplete type", so anything that has to take its size or access its members will not work. You can declare pointers to them, though.

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1  
That doesn't appear to be the issue here. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:12
    
@Oli - No? Care to elaborate? –  asveikau May 31 '11 at 17:15
    
The OP is #include-ing the header with the GenericObject definition after Vertex has been declared. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:16
1  
@Oli - But he didn't mention which compilation unit hits the error. Perhaps there is some file that includes GenericObject.h but not Vertex.h. –  asveikau May 31 '11 at 17:20
1  
Indeed. But the OP hasn't mentioned any other compilation units, so perhaps you should raise that assumption in a comment underneath the question? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 31 '11 at 17:21

At the risk of sounding pedantic, you should put your #include directives at the top of the translation unit. Then you can have:

// File vertex.h

#ifndef VERTEX_H
#define VERTEX_H

struct Vertex { ... };

#endif

And

// File gobject.h

#ifndef GOBJECT_H
#define GOBJECT_H

#include "vertex.h"

class GObject { ... }; // Use Vertex structures here

#endif

Alternatively, as pointed out, you can declare the Vertex structure in advance:

// File gobject.h

#ifndef GOBJECT_H
#define GOBJECT_H

struct Vertex; // Declaration of a struct named Vertex

class GObject { ... }; // Use Vertex structures here

#endif
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